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The more things change the more they stay the same.

Remember AOL's use of keywords to go to specific pages for companies before the days of the web? A future without a URL bar gives Google that much more power, which is just how they want it.

In that future you'll type all your urls in the google search box, and they get to show you ads for similar sites or topics, assuming you are lucky enough to be near the top.

I wonder how long before Google introduces a 'keyword' product where you can register a specific keyword to go straight to your domain.




> In that future you'll type all your urls in the google search box

The URL box and the search box have been merged in just about every current browser in some form or the other already. To most people, they're actually the same thing.

The scarier implications of this could be for phishing, which the article touches on. I'm expecting some kind of visual cue on tabs that are HTTPS eventually.

> I wonder how long before Google introduces a 'keyword' product where you can register a specific keyword to go straight to your domain.

They've had it forever: I'm Feeling Lucky.


> The URL box and the search box have been merged in just about every current browser in some form or the other already. To most people, they're actually the same thing.

The semantics are different though.

Type in 'books.com' in your URL bar.

Type in 'books.com' in the Google search box.

Not the same. The former is disappearing.


>I wonder how long before Google introduces a 'keyword' product where you can register a specific keyword to go straight to your domain.

Forever. They wouldn't restrict their market in that way. As it stands they sell the same words over and over which makes them more money and gives a better user experience.


> In that future you'll type all your urls in the google search box,...

Many users are already in that future. One of Google's most common searches is "facebook.com" or "www.facebook.com" (if memory serves, both are in the top 10, along with "facebook").

It makes me sad, but I don't think Google's complaining.




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