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While, I understand your dislike of Vim, Vi, Nano, Emacs, etc. (I can't work in them for extend periods of time either do to hand problems) They remain essential tools for many programmers and system administrators. Sometimes, you don't want to have the file pulled down and edited in a local edit and pushed back even if it is seamless. The benefits of inplace editing on remote machines is invaluable.

I think this is a cool idea. I think it needs to be cross platform. However, it must be fully backwards compatible with the full unix toolchain to be useful. If it isn't I can't use it, and a lot of other potential users will also be unable to use it.

I love the idea thanks for rethinking the terminal.




> Sometimes, you don't want to have the file pulled down and edited in a local edit and pushed back even if it is seamless. The benefits of inplace editing on remote machines is invaluable.

The benefits of having your vim settings whenever you type 'vim' rather than whatever's on the server is invaluable, too. It's not an easy task to satisfy everyone, and I wouldn't expect TermKit too; nevertheless I'm excited to see how it develops.

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If it's a server I plan on logging into more than once or twice, it's easy enough to pull down my git-managed dotfiles and have everything I come to expect.

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> They remain essential tools for many programmers and system administrators.

So maybe TermKit isn't the app for them.

> However, it must be fully backwards compatible with the full unix toolchain to be useful.

"Must"? If this app does something useful for you, great. If not, that's fine too. Every app doesn't need to be used by every person.

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edit: However, it must be fully backwards compatible with the full unix toolchain to be useful to me.

happy?

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There is potential for TermKit to send files to your client's Vim, which opens a lot of possibilities. For example, it would be easy to have files from two different servers open. It would also reduce the number of places you need your configuration files.

TermKit's author may dislike Vim, but I suspect that he's helped its users in the long run.

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vim (and other editors) have lockfiles, recovery files in case of session crashes, and assume directory locality (e.g., oops I opened the wrong file; :r filename).

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