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This was a very interesting and long read as an Asian American Tiger child myself. There are things that I agree with and things that I disagree with. There are a lot of numbers tossed around in the article but definitely not enough numbers. I can say with confidence that the reason behind Asian Americans not saturating the CEO population in fortune 500 companies is not related to how we were raised. Off the top of my head, gather the age and experience of current fortune 500 CEO's, gather the age of the current generation of Tiger children, and then you can see where I'm going from there. One thing is for sure, the author doesn't know what it's like to be a Tiger child and his interviews feel very one-sided. There's a lot more to this story.



>I can say with confidence that the reason behind Asian Americans not saturating the CEO population in fortune 500 companies is not related to how we were raised.

Don't take this the wrong way but why? The age argument, if true, simply says that the current numbers don't mean anything. It doesn't say anything about why the future is going to be different though.

I also think the story is one sided in terms of portraying all "Tiger children" as being socially inept but I do think it did a relatively good job of presenting the complexity. It was certainly a better article than I was expecting having read the title here on HN. No doubt it played on a stereotype but stereotypes do tend to be an exaggeration of the truth rather than complete fabrications.


You're right it doesn't say anything about the future. But my point was simply that he drew conclusions from numbers that shouldn't mean anything yet.


What makes you say he doesn't know what it's like to be a tiger cub, and what more would you say there is to the story?


He doesn't know what it's like to be a tiger cub because he says straight forwardly that he's never been one. His opinions are based on research and observation and I say there's more to the story because his research is incomplete and he needs to pay a visit to West Coast Asian Americans. We're quite different that the people he's been talking to.


Where does he say that in the article? I can't find it. He says that he grew up in a suburb where there were no other Asians, and then went to Rutgers. Rutgers isn't good enough for most Asian parents, but it's still pretty good. Looks like a tiger cub to me.

I don't see why tiger cubs on the West Coast would be much different from the ones on the East Coast, though there are probably more fellow tiger cubs on the West Coast to take the edge off the pain with.




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