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The same thing happened to my domain name about a month ago. (I also posted about it here.) This is happening more and more frequently, and the fact they block entire domains rather than a specific subdomain is really poor design.

I finally got it unblocked, but only thanks to a former colleague (engineer) who now works at Facebook. If that didn't work, my next step was going to be filing a lawsuit, just to try to get their attention.

A summary from spending a month trying to get this fixed:

1. The "Report" link doesn't actually do anything, or if it does, you have to get loads of people reporting to surface it to a human.

2. The best resolution may be through Ads billing, by trying to post an ad and reporting a problem displaying an ad.

3. This affects a lot more than just blocking links. It also affects messages in private DMs (including from a Facebook for Business inbox), links on Instagram, any Facebook APIs you may be using, and even getting password reset emails to that domain.

For more context, here's my post: https://watilo.com/facebooks-community-standards-censorship-...




> The best resolution may be through Ads billing, by trying to post an ad and reporting a problem displaying an ad

Something kind of like that worked at the job I a few years ago.

A large provider of free email that also runs an ad network (not Google or Microsoft) once kept flagging my employer's emails as spam. The only emails we sent were receipts to people who had purchased stuff from us, an email with installation and activation instructions to new purchasers, and replies to support tickets.

We'd go through their procedure to report false positives, and anywhere from a few days to a week later our mails would start going through...and then a few weeks later they'd start getting blocked again.

This finally ended permanently when our guy who managed ad spending called up our rep at the email provider, and asked something along the lines of "Could you explain to me why the fuck I'm spending $X thousands dollars a week on ads there to acquire new customers, and then you block us from sending those customers receipt and instructions!?".

The ad rep put him hold for a moment, and then returned with their head of IT conferenced in. The ad rep explained the problem to the IT head. The IT head then conferenced in the leader of the anti-spam team and told him to add our domain to an exception list so that nothing we sent could ever be classified as spam. The anti-spam team guy said it would be done in 10 minutes.

We never had a problem after that.


That sounds just like the (very generous interpretation of) Yelp business model. Automated systems that are as effective as elevator door close buttons, & human support available only to paying customers.

I think the origin of this wasn't even originally sinister. It's just that "free" services aren't willing to provide human support, so youtube, gmail, etc. rely on automated systems. Ultimately, only paying customers get human support, and that simple system (even assuming all actors behave well) progressively skews to the advantage of paying customers. The house edge is small, but cumulative.


Being a YouTube, Gmail or Facebook user you are not their customer. If you however buy ads from said platforms...


In the case of Gmail, you’re also their customer if you pay for it via G Suite. My support experiences with Google have been very good in that situation.


It seems likely that what's happening here is some combination of:

1) Spammers using one domain and multiple sub-domains

2) A poorly calibrated ML model for spam.

It is worth noting that FB get probably the world's largest amount of spammers, fraudsters and general bad people due to the fact that they have an absurd amount of users.

Honestly, though, if this stays on HN it will get fixed, but it's deeply concerning that if this is happening a bunch of times (and it probably is) but those sites don't appear on HN, then this will not get fixed.

It's also possible that someone has weaponised the FB spam system against dreamwidth (which seems less likely to be me, to be fair).


>It is worth noting that FB get probably the world's largest amount of spammers, fraudsters and general bad people due to the fact that they have an absurd amount of users.

Yes, and they make a ton of money from those users as well. So the question is why the Facebooks and Googles of this world don't have proper procedures in place to deal with these things in a sensible way.

If a decision gets reversed only after exploding on Hacker News or Reddit it should be considered a bug.


> If a decision gets reversed only after exploding on Hacker News or Reddit it should be considered a bug.

The problem is that we only see the cases that go viral. We don't see the cases that didn't, and thus can't actually judge how many cases get reversed via the official escalation channels.


Appreciate the technical knowledge in your comment, but simply put, OP’s response to Facebook ought to be: “Not my problem; get your shit together.”

We should collectively start holding platforms to higher expectations; they certainly have the resources to do a better job.


I would expect email to have worse spam than Facebook, because Facebook controls who can make accounts. An email provider has no control over who can make accounts to send emails to the provider's users.


> If that didn't work, my next step was going to be filing a lawsuit, just to try to get their attention.

On what grounds? They are free to remove stuff from their website




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