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Obesity, walking pace and risk of severe Covid-19 [pdf] (medrxiv.org)
20 points by throwaway888abc 30 days ago | hide | past | favorite | 13 comments



Unfortunately COVID is also a major cause of obesity (or at least increased weight and loss of physical fitness). First due to the lockdowns, and now the masks which make it harder to walk outdoors in the heat we have here, and much less appealing to even go outside. I find it very depressing to see all these masked, scared faces trying to scurry away from all these dangerous other people. Yes I wear mine all the time and keep my distance too but I just don't feel like going out anymore in this nightmare.

I limit it to a trip to the corner shop every couple of days just like during the lockdown, there's just no enjoyment in life anymore. Even a potential holiday no longer offers an escape from the misery of daily life, as COVID is everywhere.

I see in myself and the people I know it's also causing a lot of mental illness issues (usually hidden ones that surface due to all the extra stress of this 'new normal'), and all treatments for things that aren't COVID are at a minimum level around here.

We really need to find a real solution soon so we can pick up our lives again. I for one will never get used to this 'new normal' being normal at all and I definitely don't want to. For me life right now is not worth living and the only thing that keeps me going is the hope that it can return to the real normal and I can pick up the pieces of my life.

So to be honest, my obesity (and even the risk of dying from COVID itself) is the least of my worries right now.


> Unfortunately COVID is also a major cause of obesity (or at least increased weight and loss of physical fitness).

Citation, please.

For every Covid Fifteen Plus I also know a Covid Fifteen Minus. This may, of course, be limited to tech folks.

> We really need to find a real solution soon so we can pick up our lives again.

New York (and other countries) demonstrated the solution and will be back to a semblance of normal probably by September/October.

Places like Texas and California didn't have to be hugely locked down because it wasn't circulating like New York. Basic precautions would have sufficed to run the R0 below 1.0 and wipe Covid out.

But noooooooOOOOOOooooooo ... the rest of the US was to fsking stupid to do basic things like not have parties with 30 people so now they either need to go full-on New York or they're going to be in a shitty state indefinitely.


Actually, working at home, away from food trucks and sandwich shops, has led to me losing some weight. I do wear a mask on errands, but there is plenty of space on the streets around my house, allowing me to run without getting too close to others out for a walk or run.


Yeah this is what I did but the law was just changed.. Here in Catalonia, Spain there was an uptick in some towns far away from here and they decided to enforce masks all the time in all their communities, and have already stated this will be the case until the crisis is over, which could be years.


>and now the masks which make it harder to walk outdoors in the heat we have here

No big need to wear a mask outdoors unless in crowds or close conversation, in Japan they call it 'the three C's'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkmlpmFLzuo

If I'm out and about I do hold my breath for a few seconds if a jogger or cyclist passes close by, but if I forget I don't let it bother me.


Unfortunately local authorities here (Catalonia in Spain) disagree and enforce the mask even when not close to other people :(


[flagged]


While I most likely agree that there should be greater attention payed to the impact of obesity and most health outcomes, the paper gives about a 50% increase in severe outcomes for the obese. This is a far cry from the conclusion that the the virus is relatively benign for normal weight people.


This reply is little more than an invitation to begin yet another /r/fatpeoplehate thread. The article's conclusions are about slow walking pace, not obesity.

> Slow walkers had the highest risk of severe COVID19 regardless of obesity status. For example, compared to normal weight brisk walkers, the odds of severe COVID-19 in obese brisk walkers was 1.39 (0.99, 1.98), whereas the odds in normal weight slow walkers was 2.48 (1.56, 3.93).

We await Parent's elucidation of why slow walking pace is a moral failing for which people should be excoriated.


While BMI is an imperfect metric at best, it's a lot more objective than self-reported walking pace. Regardless, I can think of many reasons why a slower walking pace is associated with a higher rate of contracting COVID-19 (age, pre-existing health conditions, obesity, etc.), some of which people have no control over (age, diabetes type 1) and some of which they do (obesity).

There's been discussions ad nauseam about how to minimize the threat of COVID-19 (social distancing, hygiene, face coverings, etc.), yet one comment pointing out a way to create a healthier population to begin with is considered hateful by you. Apparently it's hateful to want overweight and obese people to change their behavior so that they are better able to fight off deadly viruses in the future.


> Apparently it's hateful to want overweight and obese people to change their behavior so that they are better able to fight off deadly viruses in the future.

Yes, it is, in that it is in practice simply a way to discard their humanity and value by blaming them for having a condition which is medically highly intractable, not well understood, and has been the subject of intensive focus for decades with little success in treatment or mitigation.

Any time someone trots out the "I wish people with X would just exercise some personal responsibility" they have done this.


>Regardless, I can think of many reasons why a slower walking pace is associated with a higher rate of contracting COVID-19 (age, pre-existing health conditions, obesity, etc.), some of which people have no control over (age, diabetes type 1) and some of which they do (obesity).

It is worth pointing out that the authors attempted to control for the reasons you listed above e.g. ( age, health issues, weight) as part of the covariate analysis. The conclusion is that in terms of risk: obese & slow > slow > obese > Normal


Actually, if you look at the figure at the end, amongst slow walkers, it makes no discernible difference whether they are normal weight, overweight, or obese (of course a difference might be evident if there were more data). So the known risk is:

   normal & slow = obese & slow > obese & brisk > normal & brisk
The last two > comparisons are a bit uncertain individually, though the combined one (obese & slow > normal & brisk) is statistically significant.


I think that your presentation obfuscates the most interesting conclusion of the paper: when taken alone, slow > obese.




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