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I work in the public sector of Denmark, and I’m involved with both developing and procuring solutions. We have quite a lot of them, around 300 for our 10.000 employees, and from a buyers perspective things like Scrum and agile rarely makes a lot of sense. It’s down to the old triangle of time, features, money, which agile and through it scrum mandates at least one has to be flexible. Only that’s now how you buy software. No one is going to give you an unlimited amount of money of time for an uncertain amount of features, and almost nobody has the time to act into your Scrum schedule to prioritise stuff. Because of this, it’s not really how you sell software either. As a result Scrum often becomes a wrapped in a business side that’s very much unified or waterfall process in companies pretending to be agile. I’m not saying it happens everywhere, but I don’t think I’ve ever been involved with a procurement or development process you could truly call agile.

That doesn’t mean you can use scrum, but it does mean that you should be careful about how you do so. If you have a bunch of guys working on different CRUD web-applications, does it really make sense to have them do a stand up every morning? Probably not. But maybe the kanban board still works well. Based on my own experiences you have to be careful and “agile” about how you build your processes to suit your changing needs, but going full strict scrum, is probably never going to work unless you’re a major tech company.




> We have quite a lot of them, around 300 for our 10.000 employees, and from a buyers perspective things like Scrum and agile rarely makes a lot of sense

> No one is going to give you an unlimited amount of money of time for an uncertain amount of features

In a customer project I worked on recently, the consultancy I work at had a contract based on the number of story points - something like, "we will deliver 200 story points in phase 1". Now, because a story point is a relatively nebulous thing, there is of course a lot of room on both sides to fiddle things, but actually the customer was pretty happy with it.

The actual scrum teams were completely miserable, but that's a separate point altogether :)




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