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> We went a step further, and tried to define this more precisely about what it means to "offer" TimescaleDB

I don't understand how the bit you posted helped make things more concrete? Section 3.21, the section you referenced lists three conditions, all of which have to be true for your product to be considered "Value Added". I agree the third condition, the one you quoted, is pretty clear. But the second condition, the one I quoted seems really vague so the definition of "Value Added" as a whole becomes really vague.

> What that means is that if you've defined the Heap schema, you have built the indexes and tables, and then are offering a SaaS product on this, you're fine.

FWIW, Heap would automatically create new tables for customers as they sign up and would also automatically create new indexes for customers as needed. For that reason alone, I'm pretty sure Heap would violate the Timescale license.

I agree that it's pretty difficult to be specific about what "value added" means. I'm not sure what the right solution is. I would still want to go over with the Timescale License with an IP lawyer pretty thoroughly before I were to use TimescaleDB.






> FWIW, Heap would automatically create new tables for customers as they sign up and would also automatically create new indexes for customers as needed. For that reason alone, I'm pretty sure Heap would violate the Timescale license.

Nope! The user doesn't define or control that those tables and indexes are created. I.e., the user, through the Heap UI, doesn't say: I want a table with this schema and I want to create an index on (event_id, timestamp).




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