Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

> Care for the open web, fear ie6, and at the same time enjoy firefox!

And remember: Chrome is the new IE.

(Since a number of people have misunderstood this quote in the past I'll explain it up front: 1. IE was in some ways technically superior to competition until they became dominant. 2. At the same time devs stopped caring about other browsers, and then 3. Microsoft lost interest in it. We are repeating this it seems, currently at step 2 for a few years already, waiting for Chrome to completely outcompete other browsers and for Google to abondon it like so many other of their projects :-)

Edit: I took the time to write down a slightly expanded version of the explanation above: https://erik.itland.no/chrome-is-the-new-internet-explorer-4...




For people who don't care about privacy, what would be the motivation for making the switch?

Chrome is good enough. The interface is still streamlined. Microsoft didn't just lose interest in IE, but it became bloated with the toolbar. The UI wasn't well proportioned in general.

Web development wise, it was a struggle to be compatible with IE. Chrome may be setting the web standard for better or worst, but atleast developers are more comfortable developing and testing Chrome. The sentiment is that writing code to work I.E. would be exceptional, whereas now writing code for non-Chrome browsers would be the exceptional case. In fact, developers sometimes only test Chrome. Some popular E2E JavaScript testing frameworks only work with Chrome.

Also, I don’t know if there are examples of Chrome implementing non-standard behavior that rivals IE having an event bubbling system that was inverted from every other browser.


I wrote a blog post last year that touches into it: https://erik.itland.no/are-you-making-a-chrome-application-o...

As a developer you get a lot for free by developing in Firefox, most importantly if it works in Firefox the it will likely work in all other browsers as well. This is, in my experience as developer and code reviewer not the case for code written and tested exclusively on Chrome.


>The sentiment is that writing code to work I.E. would be exceptional, whereas now writing code for non-Chrome browsers would be the exceptional case. In fact, developers sometimes only test Chrome. Some popular E2E JavaScript testing frameworks only work with Chrome.

This was once the case with IE, as well. Testing code in non-IE browsers used to be the exceptional case, and a lot of developers only ever tested in IE. There are countless enterprise applications that only work in IE even now, which is most likely the main reason that Microsoft is still keeping IE alive.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: