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How to Tell a Mathematician You Love Them (2017) (mathwithbaddrawings.com)
139 points by vo2maxer 15 days ago | hide | past | web | favorite | 15 comments



For the group theorists out there:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BipvGD-LCjU


better to just buy them an original batch of hagoromo chalk


Or wallpaper a wall in your home with blackboard paint.


Wallpaper with paint?


What's the deal with Hagoromo chalk? Why is it a romantic gesture?


How it's made (and why they went out of business), written by Hagamoro's president.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Companies/Hagoromo-presiden...


I have a pack. It is literally just really good chalk. When you write a lot, it's nice to have a tool that doesn't put so much strain on your wrist.



For the math geeks out here, can someone help me out with these two equations for Valentine heart - https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22317969?


Answered your question on that thread.


For the topologists.

I included this note on the flowers to be delivered to my SO:

Me: { 1/n : n ≥ 1 }

You: { 0 }

Us: Me ∪ You


Can someone explain? Is this just everything in [0, 1]? What’s the topology reference?


It's not everything in [0, 1] as e.g. 2/3 is missing. (n is conventionally an integer).

If you have a set where there's an idea of the distance between two points (a metric space), you can talk about sequences where the points get arbitrarily close together. We call these Cauchy sequences.

If a metric space has the property that every Cauchy sequence converges to a point in the space, we call it complete.

The original set of all 1/n isn't complete because the sequence 1/2, 1/3, 1/4,... could only converge to 0, which isn't in the set. If we add 0 in, the set becomes complete.

OP is saying their partner completes them :)

It's even more sweet because OP's set has the additional property that all possible Cauchy sequences have the same limit of 0, so there's only one possible limit - every end goal of every part of the set is the same, the 0. No other number will do.


No love for algebraists? :(


"Finite Simple Group of Order Two" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BipvGD-LCjU)




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