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Everyone knows that DRAM prices have been in a collapse since early this year, but last week DRAM prices hit a historic low point on the spot market. Based on data the Memory Guy collected from spot-price source InSpectrum, the lowest spot price per gigabyte for branded DRAM reached $2.59 last week.

https://thememoryguy.com/dram-prices-hit-historic-low/

You've selected out the low points on the graph: 2012, 2016, and 2019, most of the time DRAM has not been available at these prices. Now is definitely the time to load up on RAM.




7.5 percent drop since 2012 (using your numbers plus the OP’s number).

That’s not what we in computing refer to as a “collapse”.


> Now is definitely the time to load up on RAM

And it is predicted to climb back up this year, due to manufacturers dropping wafer starts at a point in time when a large launch of next-gen consoles is drastically increasing consumption.

Nope, definitely no collusion there. /s


> Everyone knows that DRAM prices have been in a collapse

I'm afraid I had no idea that had happened at all.

> since early this year,

Since..when?..now? Feb 12th is pretty early in the year AFAIAC


>the lowest spot price per gigabyte for branded DRAM reached $2.59 last week.

It would be better to reference this as quoted from the article which was written in November 2019. So not really last week

>most of the time DRAM has not been available at these prices.

I did said price floor.


If it doesen't have to be available, i could sell one stick for $0.01 and that'd be the new floor


You sure are giving any benefit of the doubt there.

Lowest massively-available price, please and thank you.


If it's lowest massively-available price then this

>most of the time DRAM has not been available at these prices.

should make it not the floor. If the floor doesen't have to be available, then what's the exact point it becomes relevant? Otherwise the price is simply misleading


Any price that is massively-available becomes relevant and stays relevant forever.

A price has to be massively available at a point in time to matter. It doesn't have to be available forever to matter. It feels like you're conflating the two.

The price is on a downward trend, but there are hitches and setbacks. One fair way to measure it is to use some kind of average. Another also-fair way to measure it is to go by the lowest "real" price, where "real" means you can buy something like a million sticks on the open market.

When we're talking about whether we should be impressed by a price, using the lowest historical price for comparison makes sense.

(And just to be absolutely clear, you would need to adjust the metric for a product that goes up in price over time. But for something on a downward trend, this metric works fine.)




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