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Cheers. Right now a11y support is a bit like IE11 support: it should work, but it's tested only sporadically since it's rather time-consuming, and as a solo dev time is rather precious. I'm also not blind myself or even a a11y expert so there will probably be some issues I'm just unaware of. I would really appreciate feedback on it, so do get in touch if you have issues.

Also, a11y support isn't just for "blind" or "disabled" users; it tends to make the page better for all users. This applies to everything really; for example while being able to tell coins apart by touch is critical for you, it's also pretty convenient for me at times, so this kind of coin design is better for everyone.




Also, a11y support isn't just for "blind" or "disabled" users; it tends to make the page better for all users.

Yes! Although I'm not "officially" disabled, I'm "blind" to my screen when I'm driving (you'll be happy to know), I'm half-blind to a message that pops on my screen when I'm drying off from a shower (no glasses in the shower is my motto), I'm "mute" when surrounded by strangers on a train, my fingers can't operate a mouse or keyboard when I'm doing dishes, etc., etc.

We're ALL disabled, and our circumstances change over very-short to very-long term as well. Having things designed with flexible interface options was one of the original goals of the web. Some of us remember before CSS, the publisher was supposed to specify semantics, and the user was supposed to specify presentation. I don't think we should go to that extreme, but I'd like to see our browsers, tools, and frameworks designed to make multi-UI flexibility easier and more common.




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