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No, it's a gmail-specific "feature". Other mail services may also implement it, I guess.





Yeah, seems there is enough other services that a RFC (under "Subaddress Extension") has been proposed https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5233 Maybe it'll get enough steam.

Edit: doesn't mean everyone will use it though! But guess the plus sign in addresses would be more "email" than just email.


It’s nice that they’re trying to standardize it but it’s an impossible standard since you can’t assume that any particular domain adheres to to it so you end up with a whitelist either way.

I guess you're seeing it from the service owners point of view, and in that case it doesn't really matter no? AFAIK, it's for the owners of the email to use the subaddressing, not for others to magically come up and use subaddressing.

So as long as you, the user and owner of an address, know that your domain supports/not supports it, you can use it.

I don't understand who would have to add any allow/blocklists?


It is supported by most mail servers, I guess, and at some time nerds all over the world were heavily promoting this scheme.

I know someone who constantly complained that web site X or company Y are stupid, because they don't follow the RFCs, don't know the syntax of mail addresses, because mail validation in web forms often rejected anything with a plus sign.

The correct answer would have been "don't do it then" or maybe "how about configuring your Exim so that instead of '+' you're using '-' as a separator, but I suppose the complaining was a big part of the fun.


Companies don't follow RFCs, as a rule, bc the only mechanism or means of doing so is if the engineering team implementing the product is aware of the relevant RFCs, and can make a case for following them to the product team. (I.M.Exp.)

There's also a generational memory issue here, and I'm not aware of any C.S./C.E. programs that cover RFCs as part of the core curriculum.


I was using this well before gmail even existed; support is not universal, but it's certainly not a "gmail feature".

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc822

(viz. not a gmail-specific feature)


I didn't see where the + had any special significance in RFC822 beyond being part of an atom. foo+a and foo+b could be two different recipients if the server desired.

fair enough



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