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“Maximum business jargon”? Is that autocorrect run amok? If not, what’s the rationale for it?





Business doesn't care that you upgraded to Python3. They care that you "integrated legacy software into a more performant and secure runtime environment" (or whatever; I suck at jargon).

My manager is 100% a business person. He doesn't know/understand tech jargon at all. If it isn't full of phrases like "breakthrough strategies", "proactively engage", "future possibilities", "cultivates innovation", "compelling picture of the vision", etc. (these are real examples from his template of what he wants our versions to look like) then we will be sent back to rework it until it is sufficiently obtuse.

From an actual time / money standpoint isn’t generating BS actually useless? I don’t understand the fetish so-called business people have for it. Can anyone make the business case? Why isn’t market competition culling this behavior?

I interpret it as a type of superstition - or more clinically speaking, pulling the brakes off the (mental) neural network, draping a big fat uncoordinated fog of "you're doing the right thing" over the whole thing, and letting the result iterate for a bit.

Humans seem to have a tendency to leverage complexity (adding layers until we can't see the bottom anymore) to keep ourselves engaged, so maybe superstition is a side effect of that.

And the problem is, because our brains find patterns in everything, and most readily in our own behaviors, it doesn't take too much iteration for us to go "wait, there's a pattern right there! that makes sense!!1" even when the result is comprised entirely of logical fallacies and chicken soup.


This is the best attempt at an explanation I’ve gotten in a couple decades of asking this question. Thank you



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