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> Kubernetes is a solution worse than the problem.

Not if you're a 1,000+ engineer org with an SOA.

> Microservices are unix pipes but slower.

Humans are way more expensive than the machines running our code. You can always spend more on spinning up additional instances. In reality the overhead isn't that bad. The principles of immutable stateless deploys free up so much mental energy when it comes to thinking about how to get your code out and not break things that it more than pays for itself.

> AI is linear algebra that costs x1000 because of the brand name.

Tell that to my real time voice conversion system I just wrote. There's a lot of new magic happening right now.

> There is no revolution in software.

I'm on a fucking phone responding from hundreds of miles away. We're launching satellites that beam internet.

> We are just building crud

You can't speak for everyone here.

Are you in adtech or a social spyware company? Maybe don't work like that then.

Find meaningful work that speaks to you.

> quality of developers tends to zero as the number of developers increases.

I work with brilliant people.




>Not if you're a 1,000+ engineer org with an SOA.

That's the problem. With a sane simple architecture instead of 40 years of crap on top of crap you wouldn't need thousands of engineers to spin up instances.

>In reality the overhead isn't that bad.

Over 1e2 times if the solution is in software, over 1e5 times if it's an fpga. Around 1e8 if you do it in silicon. You make the savings from not hiring the 1000s of engineers to deploy your bloated horror.

>The principles of immutable stateless deploys

Has nothing to do with k8s. Nixos and Guix are two systems that are as close to functional as possible and they sure as hell aren't 'stateless', even though they come closer than any of the sexy trending tech.

>Tell that to my real time voice conversion system I just wrote.

Thank you project librevox for proving a near infinite training corpus, thank you nvidia for gpus to do linear algebra 1e5 more efficiently than you can on a cpu.

>I'm on a fucking phone responding from hundreds of miles away. We're launching satellites that beam internet.

Like everything else you listed there this is a hardware improvement. A Casio watch from the 90s had the same order of magnitude computational capability as the first generation IMPs. Good luck getting it connected to the internet using any software you could write for it.


> 40 years of crap on top of crap

It's all new.

> wouldn't need thousands of engineers to spin up instances

If thousands of engineers had to worry about deploys, that'd be a problem. The deploy team is small. K8S makes this dead simple.

> Over 1e2 times if the solution is in software

That's ridiculous. Where did you get those figures?

> 1e5 times if it's an fpga. Around 1e8 if you do it in silicon

If you're writing code for FGPAs or burning it to silicon, you're far removed from application server development. That would move at a glacial pace.

> bloated horror

Our containers are thin.

> Has nothing to do with k8s.

You're just hating on k8s at this point.

> Like everything else you listed there this is a hardware improvement.

Kubernetes. :P

Honestly there's been a metric ton of software improvements. Literally everywhere.

Git, modern kernels, Rust, Paxos (popularized in the 90s), LLVM, modern game engines, tmux, Wikis, bittorrent, blockchain, protobufs, gRPC, Bazel, Redis, modern PL idioms, futures, TOTP, U2F, Markdown, RSS/Atom, so many algorithms, seam carving...


> > 40 years of crap on top of crap

> It's all new.

Now I’m tempted to reply, “No wonder that 1000+ engineers can pile up crap that fast” :)


>> Kubernetes is a solution worse than the problem.

> Not if you're a 1,000+ engineer org with an SOA.

The fact that most FAANGs (Amazon especially) developed their own systems that are not Kubernetes, and often much simpler, should make you think. Many don't even use containers - by design.

(Source: direct experience)


Amazon didn't have the kernel expertise to develop kernel features required for containers like Google did, and had massive sunk costs in their bespoke hacky solution (Apollo environments).


They didn't adopt Kubernetes because it didn't exist at the time. The original paper came out, what, four years ago?

These companies had deployment needs that weren't at the time met by off the shelf open source software.


> They didn't adopt Kubernetes because it didn't exist at the time. The original paper came out, what, four years ago?

That's not what I wrote.

I wrote that the systems they came up with are much, much less bloated and provide very comparable features - if not better.




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