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> All of my experiences related to unions have been negative.

Except the 8 hour work-day and weekends, I guess? https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/sep...






Or really any social benefits carved out from the state which have relied on unions for their mass organizing and backing of political candidates who have one them.

That was in 1938. The status quo is different today, so that doesn't really apply.

One of the biggest employee complaints at almost every tech company I've worked at is a lack of work life balance. Most of my friends who still work in the bay struggle with having a life outside of work. Wanting to work 40 hours a week can be seen as not being dedicated enough, or not being a cultural fit.

I think that's one of the most relevant needs that would drive tech workers to form a union.


The status quo is people being pressured into overtime, and having to juggle multiple part-time jobs that add up to more than 40 hours/week.

It still applies, and the status quo can get worse as soon as worker's power wanes.


So, just because politifact rated the "Henry Ford created the 40-hr workweek" false, doesn't mean that unions were the ones to create it.

As a society, employers were trending towards 40-hr workweeks and weekends. That was already where society was going voluntarily, so the fact that unions got legislation near the end of the trend (when voting it through would've been so much easier) isn't that much of a victory. It was unnecessary and just a play to take credit.


> As a society, employers were trending towards 40-hr workweeks and weekends. That was already where society was going voluntarily,

You write as if this happened on its own, 'voluntarily', by 'society' as a whole, when in fact it was driven mainly by one part of society - workers:

> "Demands for the five-day week began to proliferate in 1919, a year in which 4 million American workers went out on strike," said Priscilla Murolo, a professor of history at Sarah Lawrence College. "That was about 20 percent of the industrial labor force."




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