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Linus would have said, your expectations are not user experience.

If I want my images to execute on click events, and so on, I probably have a reason for that. If that thing looks and works horrible, I'll learn that, but it may also work perfectly, or in 99% nobody cares.




That 1% matters when you're running a large, commercial website. Look what happened to Domino's recently. Sued for having an inaccessible website. Also, refusing coupon codes over the phone since a user couldn't use your website because you ignored accessibility guidelines is in completely poor taste. You want a discount? Better have vision that at least this good and fine-grained motor control necessary for mouse usage to successfully complete placing an online order.


> If I want my images to execute on click events, and so on, I probably have a reason for that. If that thing looks and works horrible, I'll learn that, but it may also work perfectly, or in 99% nobody cares.

There's a semantic way to accomplish that. If the click event you want to add triggers an action inside the page you can do

  <button aria-title="Open modal">
    <img src="/img/surprised-pikachu.jpg" alt="Surprised Pikachu meme">
  </button>
Or if clicking in the image takes you to a different page, then

  <a href="#" aria-title="Visit the learn semantic HTML page">
    <img src="/img/surprised-pikachu.jpg" alt="Surprised Pikachu meme">
  </a>
Then you can add your click event to the surrounding element and add a few classes to remove the default stylings.


Who cares about the "Check Engine" light as long as the car drives, right? After all, as long as it works, you probably have a good reason for ignoring it, for starters, going from A to B instead of paying maintenance and waiting.

... only eventually, a quick fix will have morphed into a destroyed engine.


That's horribly out of context. Pretty much every item in this list is unnoticeable to anyone but a developer. Leaving them where they lie wont cause your website to explode or stop running. In fact, I can't recall one, that the average user would notice.


Using links instead of buttons makes accessibility to screen readers worse.

Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it doesn't have an effect


Plus, just being aware of how these elements interact with screen readers, and what you need to do for them and keyboard users can make you more aware to write better, more accessible HTML in the future.

It’s a bit strange to me that in my last position all these great JavaScript engineers were still using div’s for everything when there’s so much you can harness directly from the browser’s interpretation of these elements to give you a pleasant and consistent user experience for your clients.

Besides that, it makes trawling through your elements in your web inspectors a lot easier to read when you actually have lists, sections, headers, buttons, etc.


Is that going to make your site explode? No. That was the premise of the comment, not that it doesn't have any effect what-so-ever.




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