Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

My French bias is going to show but I wonder how Renault's Zoe is doing. It's been out for 6 years. Granted, Renault is completely absent from the US market and the car is uh... really not marketable for the US (it's tiny).



Not too good I'm afraid. Renault is already FCF negative.

https://www.cnbc.com/video/2019/10/18/renault-facing-trouble...

Their long time partner Nissan is facing troubles too:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-07-25/nissan-s-...


It's sold 35k units so far in 2019 up to September:

http://ev-sales.blogspot.com/2019/10/global-top-20-september...

And there's a new revision of the Zoe coming out soon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64iJj3HTnMQ


i've been driven in one and it was very surprising how nice it was; the price was completely prohibitive though.


I've test drived Renault Zoe. It was my first electric car driving expirience and I was amazed... Too bad it doesn't offer enough for its price.


I don't believe Renault makes Zoe to sell. They make the model for compliance with EU regulations.


Madrid has zoes for carsharing through the zity app and frankly they are perfect for the city and nearby roads.


Same in Italy, electric car sharing is exclusively using Zoe's.


Who owns the car sharing company? Is it an Energy company by any chance? a coal plant owning Energy company?


It's owned by the train company.


I'm curious, how do the regulations incentivize making a model that they don't really need to sell much of?


From what I understand, carmakers have average emissions quota across their whole range (95g/km of CO by 2021).

Having electric vehicles in the range is a way to meet the quota even if they don't sell really well.


Oh ok, I'd heard about the emissions quota, but I always thought it wasn't a simple average of the offered range, but was surely weighted by sales.


It is weighted by number of new registrations: https://www.eea.europa.eu/highlights/average-co2-emissions-f...

If a car manufacturer actually makes and registers low-emission cars just to keep the average of their fleet down, there's not really a point in just having them sit around collecting dust, so they might as well sell them.


Really? Aren't sales numbers way too high for this strategy? Like, multiple tens of thousands sold?

Compare this to the ridiculous fiat 500e at barely 2k sold...




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: