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It's pretty well known that increased policing doesn't decrease crime. These are the same tactics in new clothes used to target PoC. Even if the ML is _working properly_ the biased nature of the existing justice system is going to cause it to target PoC disproportionately.



target PoC disproportionately.

But what would be the purpose of it? Are you saying LAPD wants to put all black people in cages and then enjoy life in a city made exclusively of white (and chinese and indians)?

Or they simply enjoy being dickheads and stop-and-frisking people?


I don't know what the purpose is. I can't speak to the intentions of anybody involved, but the data are pretty clear. PoC are disproportionately stopped-and-frisked, they're disproportionately brought to court for minor offenses, disproportionately killed by police, and disproportionately sentenced, relative to white defendants.

The why is an interesting thing to pursue, but I haven't seen a satisfactory explanation of why. The what and how are more clear, though.


>But what would be the purpose of it? Are you saying LAPD wants to put all black people in cages and then enjoy life in a city made exclusively of white (and chinese and indians)?

It's mostly not about the fact that they're minorities. Ppeople have the misfortune of living in places with high enough population density to support this kind of policing just happen to be mostly minorities. The people pushing for Orwellian surveillance and policing of the inner city would be happy to expand it to the land of trees and double wide trailers were that practical to do so within current budgets.

I'm sure there's some racists here and there within government but not enough to be of consequence or to push these kinds of things on their own (IMO).

>Or they simply enjoy being dickheads and stop-and-frisking people?

They see themselves as "preventing crime" but I think it's a glass half-empty/half-full type distinction, not that it matters. It's a violation of people's rights no matter how you cut it.


What if they are run by the local communities?

Or would they prove useful in homogeneous populations with rises in certain kinds of crime?


PoC stands for People of Colour. Took me a while to work that out. I went off on a tangent trying to work out the tactics clothing manufacturers use to increase a metric called PoC.


PoC is Proof of Concept in every context I've ever seen it before.


Acronyms are often overloaded across industries. If you find yourself at a cocktail party with a bunch of biologists you will confuse them less if you say you work on machine learning than AI. A sports MVP is basically the inverse of an engineering MVP. It is no surprise that PoC in technical fields is not the same as PoC in social sciences.


> It's pretty well known that increased policing doesn't decrease crime.

I suspect that statement has a LOT of context behind it--citation please?

I could believe that increased policing simply pushes the crime around rather than gets rid of it.

> These are the same tactics in new clothes used to target PoC.

Agreed, unfortunately.


There's a lot of existing research here. Generally, the studies show that directing police patrols to high-crime areas does reduce reported crimes. For example, a recent systematic review of studies found that increasing policing to high-crime areas "generates small but noteworthy crime reductions, and these crime control benefits diffuse into areas immediately surrounding targeted crime hot spots." [1]

The question of whether policing simply pushes crime to another area is a popular one, and there's been a lot of work to answer it. It appears the answer is usually "no." Crime depends on several factors existing in one place: opportunities for crime, a lack of guardians, and motivated offenders. If you fix one area, the crime will spread to adjacent areas only if those three factors are present there.

The fairness and equity problems are, of course, severe. You may reduce crime with hotspots policing, but as the systematic review notes, "only a small number of studies examine the impacts of hot spots policing on police-community relations," or what disproportionate effects they have on any specific group.

[1] https://doi.org/10.1080/07418825.2012.673632


>I suspect that statement has a LOT of context behind it--citation please?

It's completely false of course. Not only does policing decrease crime, the US is massively underpoliced under any cost-benefit analysis.

http://www.princeton.edu/~smello/papers/Cops.pdf

https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/REST_a_0069...




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