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Haskell gives one plenty of rope to hang himself on complexity.

So much that developers develop an aversion to it as deep as fear. It's unavoidable, the ones that didn't develop it are still buried at the working of their first Rube Goldberg machine and unavailable.

You'll see plenty of blogs about a Haskell feature that end with "See? It's organized and safe. It works. Is it worth the complexity? No way! You'll never caught me using this thing that I just invented!"




Hi, I find that everything people here are complaining about (and they're valid complaints) has also been true of C++. C++ developed a lot of its complexity (particularly 15-20 yrs ago in the template space) after it got popular, so people were already wed to it.

I've used both quite a bit. Haskell's easier to learn to do well than C++ -- with the caveat that you can write java-style C++ productively without using the language very far. C++ in the "modern" style is more complex than Haskell. There are good reasons for that complexity, but it's still there.

I've seen plenty of projects where people have dug themselves into deep C++ holes -- everything is a template, all the files are headers, and the code is unreadable. These are business critical systems still in use in production worldwide.

The C++ community's really gotten good in the last 5 years or so about reigning in the bad impulses and getting people to write clean, clear, efficient code that has reasonable expressiveness.

Coming into Haskell from C++, I have the same instincts. Haskell's been a pure pleasure. The benefits are really there, and they're easy to get. You just have to think of the trade-offs.


> Haskell gives one plenty of rope to hang himself on complexity.

Interesting. And C++/Java/Javascript doesn't?

> So much that developers develop an aversion to it as deep as fear. It's unavoidable, the ones that didn't develop it are still buried at the working of their first Rube Goldberg machine and unavailable.

Wow that sounds like there would be lots of examples you can mention. Care to mention any example we can verify?

> ou'll see plenty of blogs about a Haskell feature that end with "See? It's organized and safe. It works. Is it worth the complexity? No way! You'll never caught me using this thing that I just invented!"

I have never seen such articles. Please show us a few links?




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