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Oh, I'm super privileged. Loadsamoney white male Oxford graduate. I don't quite have all the boxes ticked - I had a poor upbringing (though in a wealthy country).

That said - I don't think it's even meaningful to discuss whether someone earned their place in life. Personally I pretty much figure I was born with a reasonably "useful" organization of neurons or whatever and so lo and behold, I get rewards whilst random other people suffer. Nature is a bitch.

But I digress.

What I'm trying to get at, I think, is that the personality traits govern what you actually end up doing in life, right.

One does not simply "run for public office". You make an active choice to do that - at least if you believe in free will anyway - and so you've intentionally limited your capacity to stand out of line.

I mean, in some sense, you could even say that running for public office is precisely the opposite of that. You're intentionally choosing to fall in line with a large portion of society - you're going to be their representative!

I could expand on this more (your other examples are fairly similar - top secret classification? like that just happens?), but really what I'm trying to get at is - the level of privilege required in order to stand for what you believe in really depends on what you want to do.

You probably can't simultaneously be an oil executive and a climate protestor. No amount of money will change that.

But anyone - anyone can stand up for what they believe in. There might be sacrifice. You allude to it in 'avoid consequences which you can ignore'.

Some people - a _lot_ of people - are loss averse to the extent that they just won't do anything interesting. It's income / career / whatever maximization to the end.

I've been a stubborn prick since as far back as I can remember. Before the money. It's my defining characteristic - for good and bad.




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