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As someone who has been down this path I can offer a couple of comments.

1. Crashing or crippling the program indeed has an obvious negative PR side-effect. However it can be mitigated by inducing a very exotic crash, something like "Division by zero" or better yet - "Illegal Instruction", which would clearly point at mangled code being at fault. Also stick a thread titled "Illegal Instruction" in Support forums, explain why it happens and this will be the first hit in Google for a respective search.

2. While the trialware model is the way, it does not automatically mean it has to be an annoying nagware. What worked for one of my projects was to allow multiple consecutive trials. First was one month, next was two weeks, third and all subsequent trials were a few days long. These periods were configured on the licensing server, and the program did real-time license retrieval. So for me to be able to experiment with this model and get meaningful statistics, I had to ensure that the program at the other end of the licensing sessions is authentic. From that followed a need to safeguard parts of its code from modification and I ended up doing pretty much what eps described.

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In other words ensuring integrity of the program is needed for more than just fighting pirates. Pirates are not a big deal, let 'em steal and crack. It's the legit customers that this protection ultimately benefits.




"Division by zero" and "illegal instruction" don't sound exactly exotic. And even with a proper error message, a crshy app is perceived as defective. Assuming that the users will google the message is a long shot. I'd assume that most would simply show your binary the trash can / recycle bin / dev/null and move on.

Your second strategy sounds very interesting. Especially because you can A/B test the licensing period and the text that prompt users to register even in people who have been using the trial version for a long time.

However, I don't understand how it helps paying customers.


> I'd assume that most would simply show your binary the trash can / recycle bin / dev/null and move on.

And this is totally fine. These are the users who consciously decided to run hacked version instead of the original. Why they would do that is beyond me, but I am damn sure I will not ever see a one of them as my customer.

The only drawback is that of that them making a fuss because of the crashes and this is easily mitigated as per above. You just have to keep in mind that checking Referrers in website logs and following up on any product related discussions out there should also be a routine. So for anyone complaining about the crashes - post a link to the support article explain why and when it does that.

> However, I don't understand how it helps paying customers.

Primarily by not needing to spend any time on support/PR issues stemming from the use of hacked versions.


> What worked for one of my projects was to allow multiple consecutive trials.

Awesome. I have always been annoyed at shareware who refused to run after a given time. I sometimes installed it just out of curiosity, then forgotten about it, then came back to it when I had a real need for it and a chance to really think whether to buy it or not and just then... it refused working.




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