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We're on a slippery slope.

These buds have microphones, obviously.

I do not want my voice captured by random folks on the street without my consent and sent to Alexa.

How will opt-in looks like for such systems?




Yes, these buds have microphones like almost every other pair of earbuds and headphones (not to mention the phone they're connected to!). If you don't want people to hear you, it's probably best not to talk. Airpods even have a feature that uses the mic to boost ambient sounds, specifically so you can better hear people.


The same way it does for the ubiquitous smartphones that capture your voice now: there isn't any.


My echo dot is visible in the kitchen from the couch in the living room.

You would be surprised how often I see the Alexa device lighting up because it thinks some dialogue on TV has triggered its “Alexa... “ behavior. The number of false positives is not small. At least once per day.

Fortunately, I don’t think the device asks “sorry, I didn’t catch that” anymore since they added quiet mode.


I still get Alexa butting into conversations with the "sorry" thing. The typical response in my household is "no one asked you Alexa". And then to get a little creeped out that it hears everything.


So do Airpods. Some of Bose's headphones have had integration with Alexa etc for some time. I've noticed I've trigger Siri accidentally several times (imagine saying, "... but hey, seriously ..." in a conversation).


Do you realize that smartphones also have mics and they have been around for more than a decade? Sorry buddy, but your voice has already been captured by random folks on the street without your consent for years.


People have already been doing that for years with siri and google assistant.


Same as for google glasses. Shame the person wearing them and refuse to hang out with them. All the glassholes seemed to get it pretty quickly.


Hmm, are we supposed to also shame everybody with a mainstream smartphone ("Hey Siri" / "OK Google"), home hub, etc?

That's a LOT of shaming, when here I thought we were already shaming people quite sufficiently/too much... :-/

Honestly, never quite got the hate on Google Glass - they merely made it obvious and convenient, what so much accepted technology already does anyway :-/


Aaaaaaaand... ironically and conveniently....

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G62GWS4

Echo Frames... apparently, not enough shaming;)


Do you really thing "shaming people" is an appropriate, mature response?


In my opinion a lot of societal problems that we have exist because we don't shame people for bad decisions any more. 100 years ago the idiot in the village knew they were the idiot. Sure their life sucked. But now all of the idiots of all villages form their own little filter bubble and convince each other that they are the smart ones and that the rest of the world got it all wrong. Sounds like an improvement until you realize that this is the mechanism behind anti-vaxx, flat-earth, obama-birther, climate-change-denial and so on. Or in other words a lot of modern stupidit y that actually kills people.

So yes, I think clearly saying "I think you are stupid for wearing google glasses and I will not have a beer with you as long as you do" is a mature response. At that point they have to decide if they want to have google glasses or friends.


> "I think you are stupid for wearing google glasses and I will not have a beer with you as long as you do" is a mature response

Disagree. If I had a friend who seriously called me stupid, I'd think they're an asshole, not mature. I'd say "I don't feel comfortable around that device, would you mind putting it away while we have a beer?" is mature.

Making something about someone else, or trying to control others' actions, is not mature. Communicating your needs and concerns is where it's at.


But now all of the idiots of all villages form their own little filter bubble and convince each other that they are the smart ones and that the rest of the world got it all wrong.

Amen. Thankfully, hackernews are the smart people.


It's definitely not a mature response; I don't feel the righteous fury about these kinds of things that I did 20 years ago.

As to whether it's appropriate... social opprobrium can often be a less worse way to deal with a problem than ignoring it or going to the law.

And it could be positive; when someone dislikes how a person is behaving, they tend to form a caricature of that person. By confronting them, they're forced to deal with a real person who will defend their behavior, and it tends to replace that caricature with a more nuanced view.


Shaming works, has worked for hundreds of thousands of years.


Yeah, that’s totally why google glass failed, not because the product and the UX were subpar.


Google glass kinda seems like the inventions in this sketch, where it's clear that it could have a purpose one day and it's designed well, but right now, it just seems mostly foolish.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa_hiLXLbTc


Exactly, google glass was ugly and boring. That's why Google spinoff Niantic pivoted to gamify AR with Pokemon GO in order to take a different strategy. The idea was to get people comfortable with it using the cultural capital of Pokemon; then comes the next version of Google Glass.




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