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It pains me to see PhDs from all spheres of engineering and beyond getting funneled into a few companies, drawn by the easy money (for people not in the know, you can easily start your post-PhD career at a big corp with a salary of above 300K USD per year, and that is if you don't negotiate strongly), doing some variation of gradient descent and creating products that are absolutely immoral.



It's not just greed--there simply aren't that many other options.

Many fields now have postdocs but that's another 3-5 years, during which you'll make $50k/year, have limited job security, and may need to move. If your research works out well (good results, hot field, right connections with other researchers), you can join the fray that is the academic job market, and scrap for grants to hang onto the job. If it doesn't, it becomes harder and harder to stay a postdoc: fellowships are mostly limited to new PhDs, grants don't have enough room for non-student salaries, and institutional policies force you out.


Anyone would be drawn by "easy money" if they were swimming in debt.


To be fair, anyone would be drawn by that money even if they weren't swimming in debt. People need to realize that times are hard for a lot of people. USD300,000 is a lot of money to the vast majority of working Americans. Law of averages says that at least some of those Americans will be smart enough to get a PhD. So you're gonna have PhD's out there who, yes, will jump at the chance to make 300 bands.


>for people not in the know, you can easily start your post-PhD career at a big corp with a salary of above 300K USD per year, and that is if you don't negotiate strongly

I'm extremely skeptical that any PhD can "easily" obtain a salary of $300,000 without negotiation. Maybe 5+ years ago a few could, if they were ahead of the AI game. But what hiring manager would you be fooling today?

I'm sure there are a few PhDs here that will prove one of us wrong.

That said, I agree with your sentiment.


Where do you work, and are you sure there is nothing immoral at it?




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