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I went through exactly the same thing.

I love the coding aspect. I love using my brain, solving problems, working with intelligent people. I can't handle sitting inside for 50 hours a week, and I can't handle business politics and nonsense.

So I quit my Software Engineering job and took 2 years to drive from Alaska to Argentina, having the time of my life. [1]

Then I worked for a bit again to save money, and quit again and just got back from 3 years driving all the way around Africa. [2]

I've decided I want to be a travel writer and photographer, because it makes me happy. I have way less money, but I'm happier than I've ever been. I have written a couple of books about my adventures, and I write for a slew of magazines now too.

Do what makes you happy.

[1] The Road Chose Me Volume 1 - https://amzn.to/2wkxceX

[2] 999 Days Around Africa - https://amzn.to/2H93IUH




> I love the coding aspect. I love using my brain, solving problems, working with intelligent people. I can't handle sitting inside for 50 hours a week, and I can't handle business politics and nonsense.

A wild consideration: Doesn't the fact that many companies "select" for people who love solving hard problems (e.g. by using brainteaser coding problems in the hiring process) cause this problem? This way, the company hires people who prefer a very different kind of work than what they have to do in their job.

A further thought: How could a hiring process look like that selects for the kind of work that one actually has to do?


> A further thought: How could a hiring process look like that selects for the kind of work that one actually has to do?

Hire anyone that walks in? Kick them out if they mention anything like passion, only people motivated by money are accepted, but preferably as little as possible.




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