Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

> Also, you might want to avoid using suckless software: https://twitter.com/kuschku/status/1156488420413362177

Are you really suggesting that one should audit their use of open source tools regarding the political correctness of the free time activities of its developers?




That’s not their free time activities, that’s an official suckless conference doing a torch hike, official suckless.org mails originating from a host using a nazi reference (wolfsschanze, hitler’s summer residence) as hostname.

On the social media site screenshotted, users can choose whether to post personally, or enable for a certain post an official title. The user posting the "cultural marxism" post manually, explicitly, and intentionally enabled the "suckless.org developer" title for that post, making it an official statement of the project.

That’s not free time activities, and naming systems after hitler’s residences and making torchhikes in historic locations isn’t about "political correctness" anymore.

I’m also not suggesting one should audit all their software, but it’s good to know about what kind of software one is running.


Agree very much.

I'm normally very much against enforced political correctness but this seems to be way beyond that.

I hate nazism. I'm not particularly happy with people calling other nazis that aren't either[0], but unless there is some serious amounts of missing context this seems to be glorification of nazism.

[0]: for a starter the obvious implications of crying wolf when there is no wolf.


> That’s not their free time activities

It is. It is open source. Just because it's public doesn't make it non free time.

> I’m also not suggesting one should audit all their software, but it’s good to know about what kind of software one is running.

How does all this impact the software? Did this "kind of software" get "infected" by the views of its authors? How?

I used to think that the good thing about open source software is that the result is neutral and open for anyone to inspect, improve and use.


> It is. It is open source. Just because it's public doesn't make it non free time.

How is an official conference organized by the project itself "free time" and not related to the project?

> How does all this impact the software? Did this "kind of software" get "infected" by the views of its authors? How?

Open source is also about open community. With a project like suckless, I know I wouldn’t feel comfortable contributing to it, opening issues, or trying to submit pull requests, because I wouldn’t feel welcome in their community.

In an open source community, where many of us would end up trying to give back, that’s a major factor in whether to use such a project.


> How is an official conference organized by the project itself "free time" and not related to the project?

I'm not saying that it is not related to the project. I'm saying that they are conducting the project in their free time.

> Open source is also about open community.

If you see how different people talk about their "tech stacks" (i.e. talk to a node module maintainer and a kernel hacker and you'll see the differences), it is a misconception that there is "one" open source community. Luckily, there are many.

> I know I wouldn’t feel comfortable contributing to it

Then don't. It would even understand if you'd advise people to avoid such conferences. But advising people, i.e. non involved end users, not to use the software is a bit far.


> it is a misconception that there is "one" open source community. Luckily, there are many.

Yeah, that's the point. That the community around this particular software has a rotten core.


The whole point of using free software — as you said yourself — is the ability to inspect and improve it.

If improving that software is not possible in the same way as with other projects, which it is with suckless for some kind of people, then using the software is impacted by that.


Bit surprising that as a German you'd regard antipathy for Nazi tropes as "political correctness".


> Bit surprising that as a German you'd regard antipathy for Nazi tropes as "political correctness".

It is surprising to me that one suggests to choose software on the political views of the authors and not on technical considerations.

This has nothing to do with me being German nor did I support or endorse those (admittedly strange) views. All I'm saying is that it has nothing to do with their software.


It is not that surprising if you try to put yourself in someone else's shoes. Would you feel comfortable using and contributing to their project if you belonged to one of the groups they appear to despise?


To be honest, for 99.99% of all the software I am using, I don't even know who authored/produced it. The same for other every-day products I use and/or consume.

Actively contributing or joining a group would be an indication that you share views with them.

But having installed a piece of software maybe through a package manager? Simply using it?


I agree. I think it is unrealistic to check the "political correctness" of everything you use. But in this case, because of their own advocacy, you know now where they stand. In my case, I would prefer to not get involved, and avoid if possible, to use their project.


> I agree. I think it is unrealistic to check the "political correctness" of everything you use.

That was my whole point.

Also, for the rest, I totally agree with you.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: