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“When you join a startup, there’s a lot of emphasis on the design of the application, reusability and clean code, and the ability to conduct and undergo code reviews, as well as the ability to think of and build systems that can scale based on users and geography,” he says.

I got a good, long laugh out of this. This describes the exact opposite of my experience in a startup. None of those things were ever a concern until I worked for a company that already had a revenue stream.




I would best describe software development at startups as speed jenga. The cool thing is the objective of the game isn’t to build a functioning tower but to instead convince more people to join the game.


I mean, early stage startups fit your description, sure ... but I can't imagine many startups surviving much traction if those things don't start being looked at soon enough. Of course, some do (see twitter's Fail Whale), but I'm guessing the vast majority of startups that fail to scale ... well, they fail


There may be some confusion in my mind between companies that are only recently embarked upon a new business venture, and those who are already bringing in sufficient revenue to bootstrap further growth, but are adopting a generic "startup" branding strategy in order to shape their work culture and attract further investments.

That is, after being an indisputably young startup, the business declines to transition its identity into being a growing small business, and remains a self-described "startup" because it is secretly a huge business that is still in its second or third instar, ready to moult, and to also seem like a cooler place to work than it actually is, now that the HR department has multiple permanent employees.

The emergency all-hands pivot brainstorming meeting just doesn't seem like it can even take place in the same building as all those design discussions and code reviews.

Does anyone else think that "startup" has become a branding strategy rather than a descriptive term?


Well, there's lots of emphasis on the design of the application, reusability and clean code, and the ability to conduct and undergo code reviews, as well as the ability to think of and build systems that can scale based on users and geography... as long as all of those things cost no money and take no time, because we pay you to crank out features, code-monkey.




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