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What are owners supposed to do? Are there any indications these cars fail so rarely?



It's smartphone engineering: when it breaks, you're supposed to throw it away and buy a new one. /s


From one angle this isn't so unreasonable.

If your car never breaks down, why fix it when it does. There are already plenty of sealed units in a car. If your 2nd gear went, you'd replace the whole box.

Id be interested to know what proportion of phones actually break (except user imposed damage) before they reach the end of their useful lives, I would guess very few.


It's pretty unreasonable for many components in a car if you are paying for it yourself. There's a Model S owner who is on the 7th drive unit replacement for his car. This is a $15,000 unit.

These cars are too expensive to be disposable, but that's where they are headed because parts are difficult or impossible to obtain out of warranty.


Right, that isnt a car that never breaks down though. Teslas might not be at the required reliability to day, EVs one day might be.

Re price, an interesting point.

Do I not repair my TV because its so reliable, or because the replacement is cheap?


Or because it's very non-repairable? I've repaired two of my old NESes, but wouldn't try my TV either.

As a happy car DIYer I really appreciate when parts come in small replaceable units that I can swap out.


How many of your tvs have you actually needed to repair though?

My 14inch CRT broke, but then I had given it to my parents because I had a flat screen. I replaced the flat screen because the hdmi was out of date, it didn't have digital, etc, etc, etc. So I'm on my third tv in 25(?) years and none of them have broken (for me). I could see a nes being different as that's attached to a library of games and aren't made anymore. I would guess if they were still being made, and there was competition, a nes would be very cheap, and not worth repairing.

You only appreciate the easily replaceable units because you have to replace them


Teslas might not be at the required reliability to day, EVs one day might be.

EVs already are, they’re just not made by Tesla.

Happy Leaf Owner for Eight Trouble-Free Years


> actually break (except user imposed damage) before they reach the end of their useful lives

I'm not sure that distinction into those three categories is actually useful. Almost nothing breaks within normal use in a few years. "User damage" through cracked screens is a major factor in phone end of life. And the other determinant of "useful life" is either the battery or the operating system, both of which are under the control of the manufacturer.


My point is most of a phone is reliable, it will reliably outlast peoples need for it. I have never heard anyone complain about their processor breaking, or ram. If the processor breaks the expectation is you buy a new phone, and that's reasonable because there isn't a reason to do it any other way.

One of the promises of EVs is vastly improved reliability. Isnt it plausible if motors reliably last 500k miles that the infrastructure will never be built to replace them, and instead you'll just replace the car. Its plausible we're already at that stage with engines? If garages just become glorified body (phone repair) shops, aren't we at the scenario to gp described?


Phones would last much longer if you could swap the battery again


Which....you absolutely can. Maybe not by yourself, but a phone shop down the road will swap any battery in any phone for like ~£30. It's really not an issue at all. Most people just don't want to and the end of battery life usually concides with people feeling like they want something new and fresh, so it's a very convenient excuse to justify getting a new phone - while replacing the battery wouldn't be an issue in the slightest.


Sure, but the quality of the battery that the shop down the road will install is questionable and often below the OEM originall since the manufacturer has no incentive to sell their OEM parts outside of their service network.

YMMV but I replaced the battery on my Samsung Note with two off eBay and in both cases the life was similar to the original that already had 2 years worth of wear.


"YMMV but I replaced the battery on my Samsung Note with two off eBay and in both cases the life was similar to the original that already had 2 years worth of wear."

I see you forgot to clear the old battery information from your phone before installing the new one - the phone is still assuming you've got the old battery in and measuring as such. batterystats.bin (Android) needs to be cleared before installing a new battery, so that it is forced to get fresh information on the installed battery.


Most of the problems I've heard of with the newer Tesla models involve replacement body parts to repair damage from accidents, especially the glass roofs of the new Model 3.


>What are owners supposed to do?

Take a lesson and buy more wisely next time?


>Are there any indications these cars fail so rarely?

It's less that they fail often, in the traditional sense. The problem is that they are poorly manufactured, and the flaws manifest themselves as major issues for owners eventually.

In theory, the cars should fail less than ICE, by virtue of having fewer mechanical parts.

What do owners do? Complain on Twitter and hope for the best.




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