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It really depends on the company culture, sector, etc. There's a lot of dynamics in here.

Public companies are generally more prone to this issue, as all the ethics become abstract to shareholders. They are not involved in the dirty work.

A lot of times, companies do the right thing not because of morality, but because doing the wrong thing has a risk (from a PR disaster to a regulatory issue).

If the culture of the company is willing, the whole concept of morality is reduced to a risk/benefit formula. And they start to learn how to reduce risk, and it's a downhill from there.




> A lot of times, companies do the right thing not because of morality, but because doing the wrong thing has a risk (from a PR disaster to a regulatory issue).

I think we've all seen that at this point in time public outcry and PR disasters matter very little in the larger scope of things for such companies (Equifax, Google, Facebook, et al.)


Yeah. That's right. The pr disaster cost is getting cheaper and cheaper, allowing companies to get away with more and more.




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