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I realize I'm probably a bit of a unicorn, but I've coworked in the same co-working office for over 8 years. The businesses in the office have changed and there has been some turn over in those years but 50% of us have stayed! Those of us who have stayed the past 8 years have cycled between self employed, and employed full-time, often years at a time for one company.

We live in a small town in Colorado that has never provided work opportunities in our field, but we've always been successful working remotely.

Small town co-working has provided a huge value for us: no commute, we're out of the house, camaraderie, friendship and support. Maybe this is an example of a profitable co-working.

I know that in these past 8 years the owner has done very little recruiting and the desks are nearly always full.




> co-working has provided a huge value for us: no commute, we're out of the house, camaraderie, friendship and support. Maybe this is an example of a profitable co-working

Yep, sounds very familiar.

Our space was like that when it was the only one in town, and it was the go-to place for self-selecting people who wanted to connect with other like-minded folk.

But our city has four million people, and startups/freelancing became super-popular and demand for co-working shot up (our space actually had to turn many people away at its peak), but then the whole industry became fragmented, and our space (indeed, any space), stopped being the go-to place for "people like us".


I've done the same thing for the last 18 months in my small New Zealand town (~10,000 residents). My company is big enough to need two closed-door offices now; we're still happy to stay here, it's got a nice vibe and sharing costs keeps things reasonably cheap.




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