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Now we are stuck with Facebook, a closed platform. Or Reddit, which masquerades as an open platform, but is really closed shut.

There's only Twitter now. And Twitter kind of sucks.




Twitter, IMO, is wonderful when you stop following journalists, politicians, and A list celebrities. What that leaves is mostly meme makers and minor influencers who generally wrap all the bad stuff inside of funny jokes and hot takes.


> Twitter, IMO, is wonderful when you stop following journalists, politicians, and A list celebrities.

I've tried to, but Twitter seems to keep showing me all of this whenever someone I follow likes or retweets their posts.


See I'm not saying I get rid of them completely. I'm saying by the time it reaches me it's usually filtered through a joking retweet or a meme. So it's not as bad. Another thing I look for is if the person I'm looking at defines their whole twitter presence in terms of their politics. So people with bios that read something like "Republican. Gun Owner. Dad." or "Slut. Dirtbag leftist. Bernie would have won." generally are shied away from by me.


Twitter is also excellent for following journalists, but i keep them sectioned off into their own list and try my best to limit the attention i pay to that.

I can see why people say twitter sucks, but really it only sucks if you're following a whole bunch of different "genres" in the same feed. the prolific tweeters like to talk about twitter in sections - "politics twitter", "black twitter", "meme twitter" etc and if that's how you use it, it's pretty good.


It's too bad that Twitter itself doesn't make this into a real abstraction. I'd love to treat my feed as mixed activity from a set of isolated communities, where one community can retweet something from another community into their own community, but where this retweet acts as its own object that doesn't inform anyone from the origin community about the activity on it in the destination community. Sort of like Slack, if there were teams but no channels, only threads, and your view was a unified all-threads-in-all-teams activity stream.


> I can see why people say twitter sucks, but really it only sucks if you're following a whole bunch of different "genres" in the same feed. the prolific tweeters like to talk about twitter in sections - "politics twitter", "black twitter", "meme twitter" etc and if that's how you use it, it's pretty good.

Twitter sucks for lots of reasons, but a big one for me is that it's really tough to follow a 'genre' or topic because so few people stick to tweeting about one genre or related genres.

I only really ever used twitter to follow small(ish) tweeters and a few corporate brand accounts that weren't interactive anyway. The brand accounts never responded to anything anyone wrote to them, so twitter is, in effect, just a newsletter delivery service for them so they got filtered off into their own list. I tried following a few prolific tweeters, but I got tired of checking my feed and the prolific tweeters completely drowning out everyone else I followed. The small tweeters were more interactive (they would actually respond to things I would @ them once in a while) but they usually posted in topics all over the place. I might have followed them because someone else I follow retweeted something that I was interested in on a particular topic, video games, say, but after following them for a while, it turned out that they veer off into politics or the economy or mental health issues or racism or some other realm. Not to say that those aren't important things, but they're not the thing I was following them for, and it cluttered up the feed with things that I wasn't interested in looking at that day.

Twitter would have been a lot more useful to me if I could somehow follow topics instead of people. Yes, I know about Tweetdeck and lists and hashtags, but that presumes that I want to bother continually setting up those things as the conversations flow and evolve, or that I'm following the correct hashtag or term (e.g. I was following #widget3a and most of the interesting conversations happen with #3awidget so I missed the whole thing), or that people manage to tag their tweets appropriately, et cetera.


You can't escape it, sooner or later someone you follow will start reblogging or talking politics and then you just end up playing the mute game.

Every time something happens political I find myself having to mute all sorts of things, peoples names, places, etc.

I used to only really use RSS but then when Google effectively killed it everyone (who were already twitter addicts) just told us "Just move to Twitter, whats the big deal?", now to get the same content I used to enjoy I have to sit through endless political hot takes and arguing.

Then Tumblr took a turn for the worse and everyone cried the same thing, "Just move to Twitter, whats the big deal?"


Mastodon is great, and open. I like the community there more than Twitter's.


Which instance(s) do you like? I'm on fosstodon.


I'm on @stavros@mastodon.host, but I just follow people from wherever, I don't interact with my instance specifically.


Hate to say it, but what do you mean by "stuck"? Stuck in what way?


There are no good, open alternatives that are widely used.


There are plenty of Mastodon instances revolving around almost any topic out there to join.

Having a successful social space does not necessitate, and I'd argue precludes, having a universal audience of everyone.

Also, you are currently on what would qualify as a social network, and between HN, Mastodon, and choice tech subreddits like I find myself well inundated with social forums to talk about stuff on. Thats even precluding how Github and Gitlab have turned into faux social networks around projects, how IRC and Matrix exist as real time chat options, etc.


"Stuck" is a slight exaggeration. I can still punch whatever I want into my address bar. Why is "widely used" required? Do you search/discover through Tumblr?


Before a bunch of artists were driven off tumblr due to the overly strict adult policy (the appeals process etc. was too much of a pain) Tumblr was my go-to for a lot of artists in the niches I followed. Through this, I found a ton of communities- fandoms for the characters created by the artists, collective worldbuilding, etc. Also, within niche fandoms I followed I also found artists that produced wonderful works.

There's still an ongoing webcomic (A Tale of Two Rulers) that's a world where Zelda and Gannon choose to marry instead of war on tumblr. It's incredibly awesome and part of what I'm on tumblr for.


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