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Given that you spend the recommended one third of your net income (€5160) on housing, this means that in 45 years (~roughly a worklife) you can spend €919.512 on a house/flat (ignoring renovations, assuming 0 interest financing). In Munich, this is what a flat like that can look like: https://www.immobilienscout24.de/Suche/S-T/Wohnung-Kauf/Baye...

Also, this is _net_ income. In Germany that means healthcare is covered and you don't have to pay off large student debt.

To reach this net income, both partners have to make about 54.000 a year pre-tax.

Most important point: the data is based on surveys, which means the super-rich don't really show up.

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Is that apartment considered nice and in a good area? It looks a little dated but certainly not bad. Not sure about the price compared to hr states.

Here’s a comparable listing from Atlanta in a nice urban area. Atlanta is a lot bigger than Munich.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/867-Peachtree-St-NE-UNIT-...


If your are talking about the first one in the list - that is a very good location in Germanys most expensive city. Your link is a new building, so it immediately looks quite a bit fancier. The Munich place would probably get a new kitchen by whomever spends 800k on it.

I think you have to click through a couple of places to get a better feeling.

It's also insanely different between countryside and cities. Back home where my parents live, you could build a really, really nice house for that money. That's probably triple of what my friends back there spend on their homes, and those are really nice already.


> net income (€5160) on housing, this means that in 45 years (~roughly a worklife)

Because everybody starts their worklife with a huge salary? I don't see the point of this calculation.

> Most important point: the data is based on surveys, which means the super-rich don't really show up.

The rich and super-rich don't show up whenever only income is considered. Any class definition based on income and not wealth is pointless.


> Because everybody starts their worklife with a huge salary? I don't see the point of this calculation.

It's the simplest and quickest back-of-the-napkin calculation to try to visualize what an income like this means.

> The rich and super-rich don't show up whenever only income is considered. Any class definition based on income and not wealth is pointless.

Which is my point properly explained, thanks.


That flat looks perfectly fine, but not exactly a million euro home kind of nice. Are those prices representative? (I'm asking as a clueless American)

Depends entirely on location. This row house (https://www.ad.nl/wonen/doodnormaal-rijtjeshuis-in-amsterdam...) is on the market in Amsterdam for €1.5 million euro. This is what you can buy for that money in other parts of the country: (https://www.tubantia.nl/regio/anderhalf-miljoen-voor-een-rij...)



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