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If you want to get fancy, you can call it the Taylor approximation.

I'm a bit lazy so I try to use the F(c)= 2 * c + 32 approximation described in a sibling comment, but for the range of human-friendly temperatures the error is too big. The problem is not the absolute difference, but how each temperature feels. So I have to resort to making the exact calculation or using Google for the conversion. I'll try your method in the future.




Just go back 10% after computing 2C and the result is exact. If you don't want to deal with non-integers, round to the nearest integer when taking 10%. The final result will be the exact result rounded to the nearest integer.

Example: 22℃ -> 44 - 4 + 32 -> 72℉. (Exact is 71.6℉)

Example: 23℃ -> 46 - 5 + 32 -> 73℉. (Exact is 73.2℉)

I've seen people do the going back 10% before the doubling. That's fine if you are not going to round. If you are going to round, take off the 10% after the doubling or you could end up off by up to 1℉ for the final rounded amount.

For example, 26℃ with rounding after -> 52 - 5 + 32 = 79℉ (78.8℉ exact). With rounding before it goes -> (26 - 3) + 32 = 78℉.




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