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This is why I'm glad we have both; I don't think one resource could ever satisfy everyone. Pumped to see Rust in Action getting closer to publication too!



I just bought Rust in Action a couple weeks ago (after having gone up to chapter 11 in the No Starch book). It's definitely good to have both. I'll probably do 1/2 the new book, finish the 1st one and then finish the new one.

I did pretty much the same thing with Dave Thomas's Programming Elixir book, bailing halfway through, using a 2nd resource to consolidate, and then returning to finish it.

I like learning Rust so far. The main thing I wonder is what kinds of projects are good to do while learning. I went from Node to Rails to Phoenix and normally I just rewrite web apps I've previously created in the language I'm learning. With Rust, it feels like I should build something different, something lower-level like a tool, an emulator or a 2D game.


> I like learning Rust so far. The main thing I wonder is what kinds of projects are good to do while learning. I went from Node to Rails to Phoenix and normally I just rewrite web apps I've previously created in the language I'm learning. With Rust, it feels like I should build something different, something lower-level like a tool, an emulator or a 2D game.

If your experience is web apps, I would stick with that; Rust has a great web app story in the form of at least two mature frameworks.


This is a common issue. You don’t have to go low level; you can build anything, including web apps.


I remember mentioning in a thread here a while back that I so enjoyed flicking through your/Carols' book online that I wished I was learning Rust, though I was unlikely for practical reasons to do so. Well now I am, and that exposure via a pleasurable read was what seeded the idea.

It's true it's not a terse breakneck intro for advanced programmers. But as an experienced developer, I'm enjoying it no less for that. In any field I've been involved in, I've always enjoyed revisiting fundamentals, and in the context of learning a new (and let's be honest, not very easy or familiar) programming language this seems even more appropriate.

Perhaps if I were learning Rust for work I'd want something more distilled to get me started. Even there I'm sure I'd read TRPL at some point. But right now I'm finding it an enjoyable way to get underway for my own interest.


Thanks!


Ah, awesome, another Rust book. I'll keep an eye out for it.

Thanks!




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