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There's no call to write in such patronizing ways.

It should be up to the user to decide whether to take on updates, regardless of what you think because that's their computer and not yours and you each deserve control over the computers you own. Just as freedom of speech means sometimes people will say things you disagree with, free software computers means not everyone will keep up with the updates. But not offering software freedom is unethical and neither Zoom nor Apple are distributing software freedom. Apple has a clear record of using the power of a proprietor to expose their users to harm (more examples at https://www.gnu.org/proprietary/malware-apple.html ) and this story is an example of how Zoom apparently does as well.

What you and other posters are tellingly refusing to address is the immorality of software nonfreedom. As I wrote before, this is the core of the issue.






> It should be up to the user to decide whether to take on updates, regardless of what you think because that's their computer and not yours and you each deserve control over the computers you own.

Which is why the user can CHOOSE to have automatic updates. Or not to. The default when buying a new Mac is that automatic updates are enabled, because that’s the product Apple wants to sell and that they believe most of their users want to buy. It’s secure, it’s practical, it’s fun.

If you want to be your own IT department you simply deactivate all or some automatic updates. If you want a secure computer and trust Apple you leave it on.

I don’t see how this is a big moral question at all. Let people organize their computing needs in a way that’s safe and practical for them, not in the way that’s safe and practical for you.




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