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This post is almost surely funded by affiliate commissions paid by ExpressVPN, NordVPN, and Astrill VPN, all of which are listed as "Top VPN providers" before the article even begins. Therefore, there are some serious omissions[1] in this list.

[1] https://i0.wp.com/vpnscam.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/201...




Serious question: What's the context of the provided diagram?

Is it to imply that the named companies are closely associated with each other? ie/ Tesonet, NordVPN, HolaVPN, ProtonMail/ProtonVPN (and other named company I missed) are proven to have common interest and the common interest involve/include putting customers' privacy in danger?


> Serious question: What's the context of the provided diagram?

There are multiple partnerships and ownerships in VPN and data mining industries that are not publicly admitted, unless something goes wrong[1][2].

Although the presence of these relationships alone is not always enough to claim that customers' privacy has been violated, it makes these companies look much less trustworthy in the long run.

[1] https://www.theverge.com/2015/5/29/8685251/hola-vpn-botnet-s...

[2] https://torrentfreak.com/images/Luminati-Networks-LTD-vs-UAB... [pdf]


Thanks for your reply.

Just checked out vpnscam.com for the first time, and its content scream in tinfoil hats giving me negative first impression.

It's really a dilemma to me: small providers haven't proven themselves to be trustworthy, while well established ones are connected to another business somewhat. How does one choose a reliable VPN provider?

And same goes with self hosted OpenVPN server, what's to say that the VPS provider will always put customers' interest first?


> Just checked out vpnscam.com for the first time, and its content scream in tinfoil hats giving me negative first impression.

I think that's because this site is most likely run by some other competing VPN company. They are all trying to win by collecting and publishing everything about each other.

> It's really a dilemma to me: small providers haven't proven themselves to be trustworthy, while well established ones are connected to another business somewhat. How does one choose a reliable VPN provider?

I am personally more inclined to trust VPN providers that don't pay affiliate commissions, don't hide behind offshore companies, don't ask for their costumers' email addresses, state the full names of the people behind the company publicly, and adopt the most advanced open-source solutions early[1].

The other option is self-hosting Algo[2] on OVH or Hetzner.

[1] https://mullvad.net/en/guides/category/wireguard/

[2] https://github.com/trailofbits/algo


> How does one choose a reliable VPN provider?

Learn to do it yourself. If privacy is your top priority, you can't trust any available VPN providers out there.


Probably. So what? Doesn't make the facts of the article any less true. Just need to do research on those three companies as well independently if you want to know more.


It's important to know where one's information is coming from, even if that information is "technically" accurate. Mere facts can be misleading through context, and it's important to know where biases are.


There are many ways to lie using facts and statistics (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/51291.How_to_Lie_with_St... )

If you extrapolate a bit, apply some basic correlation twisting you can infer a lot of wrongful conclusion that is useful to specific agendas. We see this a lot in politics




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