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This. Most developers either don't want to or can't understand that there are real and valid reasons for wanting a predictable software production schedule.

That said, I've only ever seen one software project consistently meet production deadlines. Is there benefit to committing to the original schedule with Partner X if there's no way you can deliver on schedule? Or is it one of those things where Partner X has committed itself and they have no real choice but to work with the sliding deadlines?




In the example I'm thinking of the partner wasn't really bothered that the schedule slipped, but the ideal marketing window came and went before the product officially launched, which certainly affected sales. They were really excited that all the planned features made it to market though.

I'd say that some aspects of the capability maturity model make sense, even for engineering groups that practice agile day-to-day.


> the ideal marketing window came and went before the product officially launched, which certainly affected sales.

Definitely. I used to see that all the time in the games industry. Getting the right launch window is critical because most of a game's sales happen in the first few days of launch. And yet, games are famous for shipping months, even years late. They usually seem to make it work. I guess you'd be particularly hosed if you couldn't afford the burn rate for the extra X months it would take to get to a decent launch window.




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