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> ... looked like the nurses or receptionists or Dr Marks himself.

That would be because Dr Marks can't see himself. The difference between a high functioning, long term heroin addict and everyone else is that the heroin addicts require large support staffs that keep them high functioning.




The difference between a high functioning, long term heroin addict and everyone else is that the heroin addicts require large support staffs that keep them high functioning.

Not really. They require their regular fixes, but are then able to be quite functional, if highly addicted.

Where the requirement for significant resources come in is initially, vetting an addict for eligeability to enter the program.

After that it's only a question of controling the distribution. Pharmacies can function quite well as gate keepers in the process.


You mean all the people who make and prescribe and administer the heroin? If that’s your meaning, then “everyone else” has much the same problem: it’s a rare person in our society who isn’t dependent on some part of the pharmaceuticals / medical equipment / biochemical industry to keep their life together. You can’t just stop taking SSRIs if you’re on them, insulin if you’re diabetic, antibiotics in the middle of a regimen, immunosuppressants if you’ve had an organ transplant... and you could never be a doctor (without immediately causing a life-threatening incident) without a constant supply of scrub and pre-sterilized instruments.


>You can’t just stop taking SSRIs if you’re on them, insulin if you’re diabetic, antibiotics in the middle of a regimen, immunosuppressants if you’ve had an organ transplant...

These do not constitute such a large portion of the population that you can say that folks who do not require them are rare. If anything it's the opposite.

The point I make is that heroin addicts require everything that everyone else requires, plus medical support staff that provide them with cheap and safe sources to feed their addiction. Equating this with the tools of the trade of medical professionals is absurd.


The point I make is that heroin addicts require everything that everyone else requires, plus medical support staff that provide them with cheap and safe sources to feed their addiction.

Pharmacies serve quite well and rather cost efficient for this purpose. It's not really that far away of their core business of dispensing prescrition drugs. The substance is different, but the logistics are exactly the same.

You may think that pharmacy robberies are a concern, but it's not really an issue. I accept that this may not universally be the case.


Pharmacists (at least in the US) can give intramuscular injections, but are not licensed to give intravenous injections. That has to be done by nurses, or M.D's. I'm unsure as to a phlebodomist. Unless you're talking Oxycodone (sp?) or oral heroine (long release) or something of that nature. At which point, my point is mute =)


>...plus medical support staff that provide them with cheap and safe sources to feed their addiction.

These systems are already in place. Maybe I'm being presumptuous but they have pharmacies where you come from, right?


I thought it clear point well made in the text that when prescriptions were given, people could continue with normal lives. Sans such support they had other major medical problems (I knew a heroin addict that got hep from needle sharing).

If they didn't need to rob for their habit then the large 'support staff' of police is reduced.

You seem to have ignored the facts in the article. That, or there's more about your position that is not obvious, perhaps you know or have worked with some addicts and have additional experience I haven't?


So you're saying doctors are doing their job properly is a problem? How many people with bad eyesight could be high functioning individuals without their eye doctor?


what do you mean by this? it sounds like Dr marks's approach is quite resource efficient. many people are served by each clinician.




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