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I agree with your point but in the end the article was more about efficient decision making in engineering teams and less about flat organizations. Up-voted both the article and your comment :)

Reminds me about the stuff I've read about Valve. In theory, and maybe if you have strong healthy de facto leadership it could work. In practice it seems more like an excuse to dodge responsibility, leading to pretty toxic places to work - but maybe there's another side to it.

https://twitter.com/PastelChum/status/1136470238265040896






This is a common criticism of Valve's model, and it's fair to say that Valve's model isn't clearly obviously better, but those attack's on Valve don't make the case that the traditional hierarchical model, with its own well-known problems, is better.

>This is a common criticism of Valve's model, and it's fair to say that Valve's model isn't clearly obviously better, but those attack's on Valve don't make the case that the traditional hierarchical model, with its own well-known problems, is better.

I would say that the key difference is that in the traditional model I can learn about my potential bosses during the interview process. In the valve model I don't even know who my bosses will be during the interview process. As people like to say, interviews are a two way process.


Also getting a shitty task might be a lot better than getting no task and then getting criticised for lack of ambition.

If finding tasks is part of your job that might be a fair criticism.

Do you have a good link about Valveā€™s model and are they a socialist / EMPLOYEE OWNED organization?

Update: I read about it and no, they are basically anarcho syndicalist and overall owned by a enligtened/benevolent set of owners.


Jeri Ellsworth after she pulled the ripcord:

https://www.wired.com/2013/07/wireduk-valve-jeri-ellsworth/




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