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> He attended Stuyvesant [0], one of the highest acclaimed high school educations [1][2]. I'm sure that had a bit to do with how the rest panned out compared to just anyone.

It also doesn't guarantee that you will be successful in life. My closest childhood friend attended CMU full ride and was a CS major. I last saw him in my hometown disheveled and pushing a shopping cart around. What you do with what you are given is way more important than what school you went to, or even what country you were born in.




It's not a guarantee, but the right kind of schooling - in the educational sense, the networking sense, and the passing on of class-appropriate behaviours sense - hugely improves the odds of success.

As this article proves. The ability to invest disposable income is a defining class marker in the US.

You don't get to play the game if you literally have no surplus income - and many Americans don't.


> in the educational sense, the networking sense, and the passing on of class-appropriate behaviours sense - hugely improves the odds of success.

That's fair. I agree on this point. The network at an Ivy League can open doors for you that a state school could never open for you.

But I disagree on one point. It comes down to ambition. It's almost like a fire within your soul. If you have that fire kindled within you, it won't matter where you started from.

I have seen miracles in my life. A man with no arms and legs going around with a motorized wheelchair, using his chin to control acceleration/deceleration. When I saw this man, I realized that I was holding my self back. Anything is possible. If that man who had no limbs could walk, I had no excuses to give anymore.


> You don't get to play the game if you literally have no surplus income - and many Americans don't.

Except...he was a poor Indian immigrant who presumably did not have disposal income. So how then did he not only play the game, but seemingly win it?


It's an uncomfortable and often painful truth for many. Climbing an insurmountable mountain, whether it is a personal failing, or desire, one will start to justify their own failings. It's the human psyche after all. But what they miss is belief, a leap, faith, the fire within themselves, etc...

I like to think of Heracles. He had his twelve labours. It's a metaphor for not giving up, no matter how large the challenge is.




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