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I keep trying to explain to people that our customers don’t care that there is someone to blame they just want their shit to work. There are advantages to having autonomy when things break.

There’s a fine line or at least some subtlety here though. This leads to some interesting conversations when people notice how hard I push back against NIH. You don’t have to be the author to understand and be able to fiddle with tool internals. In a pinch you can tinker with things you run yourself.




> I keep trying to explain to people that our customers don’t care that there is someone to blame they just want their shit to work. There are advantages to having autonomy when things break.

There are also advantages to being part of the herd.

When you are hosted at some non-cloud data center, and they have a problem that takes them offline, your customers notice.

When you are hosted at a giant cloud provider, and they have a problem that takes them offline, your customers might not even notice because your business is just one of dozens of businesses and services they use that aren't working for them.


Of course customers don't care about the root cause. The point of the cloud isn't to have a convenient scapegoat to punt blame to when your business is affected. It's a calculated risk that uptime will be superior compared to running and maintaining your own infrastructure, thus allowing your business to offer an overall better customer experience. Even when big outages like this one are taken into account, it's often a pretty good bet to take.


What does NIH stand for?


Not Invented Here




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