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This makes me very sad for many reasons:

* People are losing their freedom of privacy in the name of safety and most accept it. Many are likely unaware at this stage of the trade-off.

* One activist was in presence by happen chance, otherwise this likely would have gone unreported.

* The database _currently_ only keeps peoples data for 30 days. When the UK leaves the EU, this will likely be extended. China has already experienced multiple data breaches.

* It's unclear what data is kept and deleted, I suspect that metadata may be retained indefinitely.

* The money being spent on these systems could be spent getting more officers on the ground. I have no doubt they are sinking millions of pounds into this project.

* The police initially started testing this system illegally, there were no repercussions.

* The majority of people being arrested as a result of this technology are probably not the worst people in society. I believe this will be used to disproportionately target poorer people and petty crimes.

* Telling an officer to "fuck off" or "piss off" is not a crime. It's not an offense to be rude and you certainly shouldn't have to "Wind your neck in" in fear of a public servant.






> Telling an officer to "fuck off" or "piss off" is not a crime. It's not an offense to be rude and you certainly shouldn't have to "Wind your neck in" in fear of a public servant.

Yes it is: From the Public Order Act 1986 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1986/64)

A person is guilty of an offence if, with intent to cause a person harassment, alarm or distress, he—

(a)uses threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour, or disorderly behaviour, or

(b)displays any writing, sign or other visible representation which is threatening, abusive or insulting,

thereby causing that or another person harassment, alarm or distress.


There are exceptions for police officers though, who are expected to tolerate some swearing. Relevant cases are listed on Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_5_Public_Order_Act_198...


Well it is just like I learn for driving test that one should remain calm if other driver jumps red light, cut him off or honks unnecessarily. It does not mean aggressor is right, just that one should try de-escalate the situation.

I think TV has created an image where young people can get really aggressive or even physical with police, doctor/nurses etc. The receiving side of this aggression are quite understanding people who'd say 'oh this guy is just emotionally hurt and it should be fine'.

Always start your sentence with "In my opinion you should..."

> Telling an officer to "fuck off" or "piss off" is not a crime.

This is largely true but

> It's not an offense to be rude

is rightly or wrongly a very broad grey area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_5_Public_Order_Act_198...


Also, if you're aggressive IIRC then it can be considered to be threatening.

I am told my stature alone is 'threatening' and 'agressive'. My freedon to express myself without fear of imprisonment is affected in many situations. I find this verbage frightening when written in law without very clear and unambigious definitions.



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