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I'll re-emphasize the table I linked before, though I agree with one of the other responses that the OP meant that the benefits are marginal on an overall basis so my response wasn't strictly addressing the comment.

https://postimg.cc/pmQCfdZq

They absolutely distinguish between poultry and beef, though they don't distinguish steak from hamburger. They specified exactly what that breakdown was in the table and I doubt that it's random.

137gm red meat, 57gm poultry, 22gm fish per day on average per person using the "meat-based diet" model.

Assuming that pork and beef are both "red meat", the USDA availability chart (couldn't find consumption) is here:

https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/chart-gallery/gallery...

and what I see is about 100 pounds of red meat, 65 pounds of poultry, and 15 pounds of fish per person per year available. 100 pounds of red meat per year is 124gm/day, and the ratios are a little off but not by a ton. They definitely report what their diet assumptions were though... my guess is they had a more robust model diet from USDA they used than the chart of clearly not quite the right dataset I took that from.






>> 137gm red meat, 57gm poultry, 22gm fish per day on average per person using the "meat-based diet" model.

There's a big gap between that and a vegetarian or vegan diet. There is definitely a lot of room in between for plant-based diets with a reasonable amount of meat (say chicken or fish twice a weak and a Sunday roast once or twice a month). I'm willing to bet that this kind of diet is much more common than one including a hearty portion of meat every day and that comparing this diet to vegetarian or vegan diets would yield a much less significant difference in terms of environmental impact.


This seems unlikely to have escaped the author? Of course a hybrid diet would be in between, I'm just saying that the diet breakdowns they chose to present are almost certainly model diets from literature rather than arbitrarily chosen to make meat eaters look bad. It's a thesis, not PETA marketing material, there are some standards for rigor and they would have needed to cite and justify why they chose what they chose.

That said, I honestly do not think that your diet suggestion is common for Americans, I rarely see people go a meal without meat. The total of 216gm/day is only 7.6 ounces of meat, and I remember getting weird looks ordering only a 6 ounce steak as an adult. And burgers are frequently about a half pound too. Or a chicken breast. It seems totally believable to me that this is average even accounting for less frequent consumers of meat.

I take efforts to rarely eat it so I'm probably barely different from vegetarian. Obviously hybrid diets will fall somewhere in between? I'm not presently an advocate for no-meat product diets because I don't like extremes but I am an advocate for using substitutes when there's little difference. Like taco bell meat could be soy-based meat-substitute ground and literally no one would notice.


>> This seems unlikely to have escaped the author? Of course a hybrid diet would be in between, I'm just saying that the diet breakdowns they chose to present are almost certainly model diets from literature rather than arbitrarily chosen to make meat eaters look bad. It's a thesis, not PETA marketing material, there are some standards for rigor and they would have needed to cite and justify why they chose what they chose.

Why assume so much? The thesis is in the link you provided. You can easily check whether what you suppose in this comment is true or not.

>> That said, I honestly do not think that your diet suggestion is common for Americans, I rarely see people go a meal without meat.

So this "meat-based" diet is only relevant to Americans? That makes sense- but in that case, the comparison with vegetarian and vegan diets is also only relevant to Americans. i.e. it's American "meat-based" diets that are more environmentally wasteful compared to American "vegetarian" diets etc.




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