Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

Largely agree with this except the initial objection "Data structure and functions should not be bound together" and the "Why was OO popular?" which is missing the response - because using the notion that "objects" from the real world encapsulate state and behaviour was not only a solid premise, but it was an attempt to interface the computer world with the real. This was not a failed concept. It makes some sense. Just very few teams find the discipline to model their core domain this way.

Which brings be back to the original objection. I think this is true most of the time, except when it's not - which is your core Domain Model. The first 1/2 of the Blue Book[1] lays out straightforward means to arrange code, functions, data/state and related behaviours in a way which can be managed and maintained over time. This is pretty important as most folks who've spent any length of time maintaining vast applications will know that it's incredibly hard to reason about a first-class concept in an application without clear boundaries around said concept, it's structures and it's behaviour. Most of us are unlucky and find this scattered across the landscape. Few applications take the focus to "model" these concepts clearly.

Does this modelling have to be done with "Domain Model", or DDD, or something else that can be loosely coupled with OOD - probably not. But another developer absolutely has to be able to reason about said structures and behaviour. They have to be able to read it easily and grok it quickly. And having done that, they don't want to be surprised by some distant missing element, 20 calls or 1000 lines or 15 modules (repos, submodules, etc, etc) away! This is possibly the biggest time-sink and therefore "cost" of development. One could also take this further and postulate that about 1/2 of us are employed as a direct result of applications whose core concepts are so poorly designed or hard to reason about, that a massive volume of work (time?) is dedicated to unwinding the ambiguity that results.

I don't want to suggest that OOP or OOD/DDD/{other modelling process} would necessarily fix this, but the attempt to clarify and find a means to make modelling these critical concepts easier and less costly is admirable IMO.

It's ok if your infrastructure takes a different approach, or is "functional" or "dynamic" in nature. If your test suite uses completely different patterns and paradigms because the tooling makes that easy then - awesome! But if the core model/concepts of your application are hard to understand, reason about, and therefore maintain, then you're pretty fucked.

OO doesn't "suck". It's spirit is just largely lost and like many other things in life, it's been hijacked and mutilated into something many of us come to loathe because we've never seen it deliver on the promises. I guess we will be having this conversation again in another decade about something else that's hugely popular right now.

[1] https://www.amazon.com/Domain-Driven-Design-Tackling-Complex...




Guidelines | FAQ | Lists | API | Security | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: