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> Being recognized as the customer, with real rights, is of pivotal importance in receiving the care you need, when you need it.

Except if your poor though right? Isn't that really the case?

In the UK we don't tend to ignore kids broken bones if they have poor parents. No one goes bankrupt and ends up homeless for contracting an illness, or having an accident at work.

We also spend less on our taxes towards the NHS than Americans spend on their Medicare - and then you have to pay for private 'health care' insurance on top, including all of the 'co pays' and whatever. It's a system that's rigged against you. For the rich, by the rich, to make the rich richer.

Even if the top 1% of private healthcare is better in the USA, you're ignoring the 99% of healthcare that isn't.

Most Americans just can't see the simple fact - many many other countries are better at this than you are. This is a solved problem in many other developed countries.

Universal healthcare simply benefits everyone in society, and does so purley for the common good.




> In the UK we don't tend to ignore kids broken bones if they have poor parents. No one goes bankrupt and ends up homeless for contracting an illness, or having an accident at work.

Kids with broken bones are at the easy end of the scale. Most people, before they have experienced serious, complicated, expensive health issues, have a series of relatively positive experiences with the NHS in which they present with a minor issue that is dealt with by in a satisfactory manner. The system is optimized for that. This maintains the illusion that, through your taxes, your health requirements are "covered".

This falls apart once you present with something more complicated. You might be surprised at the extent to which people in the UK are pretty much abandoned when they hit a certain point. I know of many cases in which people had to find the money, somewhere, to buy vital treatment that the NHS was not willing to allocate. This is no less brutal than what happens to the uninsured in the US ... but ... the big difference is that UK residents are under the delusion that they do not need to worry.

Again, my argument is not that the NHS is bad, or evil, or that it does not sometimes do a good job. What I am saying is that, over your lifetime as a whole, it costs more than good health insurance would while letting you down badly when, inevitably, you encounter more serious problems.

The best way to help the poor is to improve the economy. A massive, complicated tax system makes it particularly hard to hire people at the low-end of the skill range. It is simply not worth it, and this will become increasingly evident as workers continue to be replaced by technology.

The UK has ended up with a multi-generational unemployed class who are under the illusion that everything will be taken care of "from cradle to grave". Their personal agency has been almost entirely removed. Alcoholism, obesity, diabetes and depression are at epidemic levels among the unemployed. We have created the perfect storm and it is the poor who will bear the brunt of that.




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