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There are a number of other buildings with office space in Manhattan. Not many have multiple datacenter floors covering a city block. One of these characteristics is more relevant to Google than the other.

// As an aside, it's curious that 60 Hudson St looks so much like one end of 111 8th Ave.




Your parent comment reads like you are asserting that this building is used for datacenters only.

Also the article itself states that they likely aren't that interested in hosting their own servers in this building:

Google’s purchase of the building provides access to additional office space for its growing New York sales and engineering operation at 111 8th Avenue...

While Google could build out its own data center space at 111 8th Avenue, the cost of power in New York probably precludes a massive server farm in the building. Most of Google’s large-scale data centers are located in suburban or rural areas with cheaper power.


The headline here on HN fails to convey why Google has an interest in this building.

That it contains offices is of secondary importance. We don't describe Interpol suspects by starting with the characteristic that they are 60% water.

Also, the citation is speculation ("probably"). If the cost of power "precludes" a massive server farm in the building, there wouldn't be multiple massive server farms in the building. Our cost for power in Manhattan is only negligibly different than in Texas.

The quote about rural areas with cheap power has nothing to do with the importance of being at 111 8th Ave for peering.


That it contains offices is of secondary importance.

That is a huge assumption on your part.

Our cost for power in Manhattan is only negligibly different than in Texas.

The consumer cost may be similar, but any smart company building data centers will try to find deals that reduce their cost well below what consumers pay. Those deals tend to be easier to find in rural areas.

The quote about rural areas with cheap power has nothing to do with the importance of being at 111 8th Ave for peering.

Google's only interest to date in this building is that it houses a growing number of employees, and is currently at 2000. Google is not in the high frequency trading business, and so is unlikely to have too much interest in the advantages of the location for peering. There is therefore no reason to believe that Google cares about anything other than the advantages of being their own landlord and guaranteeing access to enough co-located office space for their needs.

(Note, I am currently employed at Google. However I have no inside knowledge about this deal.)


"The headline here on HN fails to convey why Google has an interest in this building"

Well, that's what the article being linked to is for :)


My initial comment was about the headline, not the article, which doesn't mention the phrase "office building".

More headlines like saying "Google bought an office building":

- "Netflix offering $100,000 an hour for color video"

- "Google spends $6M stock to keep computer user from Facebook"

- "Joe Lieberman demands Amazon.com take English-language documents offline"

They're true, but they're not the point.


we got the point already, relax, it's not that big of a deal :)


Although you have to suspect that at least some of Google's users are in New York (I hear they have computers there now) so at some point putting the data where the users are using it does make sense.

Power is expensive in big cities but so is infinite bandwidth and the speed of light is still annoyingly finite.




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