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Skipping breakfast is wrong, in any context.

The result of not eating anything for breakfast is that the body reduces consumption ("metabolism"); this is exactly what one wants to avoid in diets.

This can be tested very simply. Compare the time of the morning when you start feeling hunger between when you have a breakfast (even a relatively light one, which is what one would do in a weight-loss diet), and when you don't have it.

Most people will paradoxically feel hunger earlier when they have a breakfast compared to when they don't.

This is the major paradox of weight loss: eating less by itself is not necessarily more productive (diet-wise) than eating more.




> Skipping breakfast is wrong, in any context.

Different things work for different people, so saying something is always wrong is itself wrong.

> The result of not eating anything for breakfast is that the body reduces consumption ("metabolism");

Any evidence for this?

> Most people will paradoxically feel hunger earlier when they have a breakfast compared to when they don't.

So if they don't have breakfast they'd feel hungry later. Isn't that what you want?

Overall, I think skipping breakfast is a trick that reduces the window of time available to eat and thereby restricts your caloric intake. It also trains you to only eat when you actually feel hungry instead of being a slave to set mealtimes.


Metabolism does drop under a caloric deficit, but it has to be longer term deficit afaik.

Skipping breakfast has the nice effect of making dinner available for social outings, while still having a fasting window.


Old wives tale. Meal timing has no effect on 24h metabolism.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24847666


> Skipping breakfast is wrong, in any context.

Conclusion of a recent Vox video[1]:

> That means if you’re a breakfast eater, (…) you can carry on. And if you’re a breakfast skipper, (…) don’t worry. The best science we have suggests we’re probably just fine either way.

In the video description, they link to the studies they based their information on:

* https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/364/bmj.l42.full.pdf

* http://faculty.seattlecentral.edu/jwhorley/Breakfast_BMI.pdf

* https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4473164/

[1]: https://youtu.be/9Ffceu672c4


I'm 43, and I eat breakfast about once every three months. Sure I might eat lunch earlier than most, but since I was 14 I stopped eating breakfast and it largely haven't been missed.

What most people call breakfast is cereal of some kind, loaded with sugar. That's not even a proper meal in my humble opinion. (Sure some people might have fruit, toast, rice, or something more interesting. I guess this is very location-specific. In the UK my parents insisted I ate frosties, or corn-flakes, up until I was about 14 when I just said "no".)

Breakfast for me is coffee. Black. Strong.


Look, everybody is different, but as someone for whom losing weight is pretty easy, skipping breakfast is one of the easiest ways I do it.


I routinely skip breakfast and I have an extremely high metabolic rate and my weight stays within a normal range for my height. I just don't feel hungry in the morning. There is no one rule that applies to everyone.




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