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Tesla is offering iterative improvements for free.

The above post is saying that they’ll need to offer groundbreaking cutting edge tech that doesn’t even exist yet ... for free.

All the while this tech is being invented Tesla is selling more cars that will need this technology.




If the improvements happen in software, deploying them for free is obviously not an issue. The question is how much the necessary hardware modifications would cost. But they're charging thousands of dollars for the option, which gives them some leeway to at least break even there, especially if you consider the time value of money between when they sell the option and when they deliver it.

The real question is, what happens if "full self driving" doesn't arrive for another 30 years?

But if you think car companies have never promised something they weren't sure they could deliver, you're not aware of the incumbents' unfunded pension liabilities.


> But if you think car companies have never promised something they weren't sure they could deliver, you're not aware of the incumbents' unfunded pension liabilities.

Can we just get rid of whataboutism here entirely, please, HN?

One wrong does not excuse another.


This the original post in this thread:

> It is kinda amazing that Elon Musk is selling cars based on speculative future breakthroughs in technology. That must be a first.

But promising things based on speculation about the future is not new, it's common practice. It may be a questionable idea, but the claim was that it's unusual. It's not.


Please do provide one example in which any car manufacturer promised features, which were outright vapor ware.

Cheating, i.e. Dieselgate, doesn't count. That was not a promised feature, this was outright fraud.


> Please do provide one example in which any car manufacturer promised features, which were outright vapor ware.

Volkswagen has been advertising their EV charging network (Electrify America), promising to expand availability in the future:

https://www.electrifyamerica.com/our-plan

If you buy one of their electric cars planning to use it, you're assuming they're actually going to build it, and if you live near one of the proposed sites, actually build that one in particular.

And this is hardly new. Ford Sync is more than a decade old, but when it came out they were advertising all the things you could theoretically do with it, many of which were contingent on third parties writing apps for it. Some of that actually happened, some of it didn't, but it wasn't all there on day one.


Fair enough.

Thanks.


Whataboutism is “X isn’t bad because Y is worse/also bad”.

Parent was saying “X will probably be bad because similar Y was bad in the same dimension (here, overpromising)”.

Maybe not a solid argument, but it isn’t whataboutism.

Edit: Never mind, it looks like I misread the parent's point, and he was saying that it's no big deal to promise something without being sure you can deliver because the Big Three did it with pensions.


You've used different phrasing to say the same thing.


On second thought, I misread the argument, and I agree it's whataboutism. See edit. (However, if my misreading had been correct, it wouldn't have been whataboutism, as it would be a prediction that Tesla would also be bad.)




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