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The bulk of the work is cleaning up each of the scans, re-framing the picture, balancing the color, and making sure the correct takes are used, rather than simply applying an EDL.

It's possible ML could help with a lot of that, but the budget just isn't there.

While it was shot on film, the effects weren't, each has to be created again, not just the external scenes like the Defiant shooting something, but scenes like Odo morphing

Here's a comparison picture of the DVD vs film quality though

https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/rlppv8gs4m...




That's an incredible difference. Obviously NTSC was going to lose a lot of color detail, but it also lost quite a bit of vibrancy. In particular the warm highlight lighting from offscreen to the right is barely visible in the DVD version, but on the film version it really pops; look at his sleeve, the shadow cast by his hand, and the contrast of the bottle with the background. The value contrast is similar but the color contrast is greatly muted.

[edit]

On second thought, considering the shirts that Jake wore on the show, it's probably better for the world that we don't have the higher vibrancy film version.,,


But also, compare the color of Garak's hand to his head. The high-quality one brings out more inconsistencies that break suspension of disbelief.


That's because of the orange light. Looks close enough to me.


> Obviously NTSC was going to lose a lot of color detail, but it also lost quite a bit of vibrancy.

Remember that those who do a lot of video call NTSC "Never The Same Color"


As opposed to "People Appear Lavender"?


When I played a broadcast engineer helper for one of the British TV companies in the 80ies NTSC feeds that we would sometimes get from AP would cause a total freak out. We would tweak the colors on a test feed and pray that the live AP feed would be at least somewhat close. We would hit it on the nose less than 1/3rd of the time.


Star Trek: The Original Series had the opposite problem. They wanted their aliens to be different colors (e.g. green Orions) but:

The technician over at the film lab would receive the film every day and run it through the development solution. As the image formed on the film, he kept saying to himself, ‘My God, this woman is green!’ And so he kept correcting the film developing process in order to turn her back to normal skin color again!

"Imagine everyone’s surprise, upon viewing the developed film the next day, to find the actress’ face just as normally pink skinned as ever! There was no trace of green."

http://www.startrek.com/article/trouble-keeping-her-green


Wow. The film looks so good. This upsampling, on the other hand, is to my eyes so subtle of an improvement to almost be imperceptible.


It has artefacts. If you look at some near similar defined geometrys, they stay unmoving for split seconds. Siscos upper head collapses in on himself, when he moves..


I think I saw that on the DVDs themselves, or at least on netflix. I suspect the source material was heavily compressed


Incidentally, it appears most of the CGI models still exist, at least in the hands of the original modelers. http://trekcore.com/blog/2013/05/deep-space-nine-in-high-def...




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