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Even in the US you eventually need to basically 'register with the government' (usually in the form of getting your ID/drivers license updated, and notifying USPS of mail service change).



You only need to update your drivers license when you change states, not when you change residences. (And if you don’t drive you don’t need to do that either.) And you don’t neee to notify USPS of your mailing address.


In every state, you must notify the DMV of a change in residence, typically within 30 days.


Have you ever heard of someone getting ticketed for not doing this? I have never once notified the DMV of anything, and have driven for years with old addresses on my license.

And, of course, if you don't drive, none of this applies.


I've actually gotten ticketed for this in Texas outside of Austin on the way back from Round Rock. It wasn't very expensive but was thrown onto a ticket for speeding.

I think it was a speed trap(I got a ticket for going 64 in a 55) and he knew he could get an extra infraction if my address was out of date which probably happened a lot with college students because they move a lot, don't update their address, and are dumb enough to admit it to a cop.


> Have you ever heard of someone getting ticketed for not doing this?

Yes.

> I have never once notified the DMV of anything, and have driven for years with old addresses on my license.

You might want to fix that. In some states it's a misdemeanor rather than an infraction.

> And, of course, if you don't drive, none of this applies.

True, but I was only addressing the inaccurate information, because it could have consequences for people who believe it is true.


That's interesting. I'm not sure I see how it could be anything worse than the penalty for driving without your drivers license (which will always get you ticketed, but rarely anything worse). I can always just not present my license at all.


> I can always just not present my license at all.

Sure, that might work.

But a likely scenario is the officer will ask your name and DOB and look you up on his MDT and now you've got three tickets (including whatever you were pulled over for because now it is definitely not going to be a warning) instead of just one.

Another scenario is the officer discovers you have your license and are just refusing to show your license. In California, and other states, you've now escalated a simple ticket to a misdemeanor with large fine and possible jail time.

Another scenario is you just update your address with the DMV and don't risk compounding your problems during a traffic stop.


Right, I'm not suggesting you can't get a ticket for it (though that's never happened to me; the police always asked "is this your current address" and I'd say "nope" and give them my actual address and that'd be the end of it --- it is handy that I'm a middle-aged white dude, though). I'm just surprised by the idea you could get worse than a ticket.

I don't at all see how you could get in trouble for "refusing" to show your license. You'd just say you didn't realize you had it. (This is relevant to my interests; in Chicago, your DL is also your bond on tickets, and also, when you get a new license, you get a paper temp license day-of, good for several months, and the real license in the mail; I'm holding on to the paper temp and denying possession of the real one if I'm ever pulled over, because getting bonded DL's back is a giant pain.)

I'd be interested in knowing whether you could point me to a state that explicitly says not updating your address is a misdemeanor.


> I'd be interested in knowing whether you could point me to a state that explicitly says not updating your address is a misdemeanor.

Sure. It's a misdemeanor in Minnesota (171.11): http://mncourts.gov/mncourtsgov/media/scao_library/Statewide...

I was also going to say North Carolina, but it appears they've changed it: http://www.theeastcarolinian.com/news/article_5137386e-2256-...


Interesting. It's a cheap fix-it ticket (much cheaper than a speeding ticket) in MN, but (apparently) it's annoying because it requires an actual court appearance (I haven't cracked the code on which offenses require court appearances in Chicago; I've only had to go once or twice. I wonder if those were misdemeanors as well.)


I have, but it was in Montana and many years ago.

Turns out if you want to appeal your cook county tax, you need a current drivers license


Change of address within Illinois is required within ten days after moving. I remember in Montana it was required on the day you started a job and in that case people were getting tickets




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