Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

internet visitors must be asked for permission in advance for any tracking software to be placed — such as third-party tracking cookies; tracking pixels; and browser fingerprinting tech — and that that permission must be freely obtained... Is this really what we want?

Yes. I'm not even European, and I'm perfectly fine with this.

Ask me to track me. If I like you, your web site, or your content, then sure. I'll give you a little personal data.




So once you've determined that you like a site you are going through the hassle of figuring out how you can reenable the tracking after you disabled it on your first visit?


“you’ve visited this site a few times recently. are you still okay with these settings? (if you ever change your mind, click privacy at the bottom of the page)”

just because we don’t currently have solutions doesn’t mean they aren’t out there. i guarantee my 5 second developer definitely not UX idea is the LEAST that a real UX professional will come up with, when pushed

*EDIT: and yes this kind of cookie is okay with GDPR because it’s not tracking a “data subject”... it’s maybe a broad timestamp (the day you first accessed the site), and a counter for the number of articles/site loads... you don’t have to ask for this permission, because you can’t track someone with it


It can also be implemented purely on the client side: store the counter in the browser, increment on each visit, and prompt the user after N visits.

This way, no information about the client is sent to the server at all.


I have faith that the best and brightest people in the SV bubble will find a way to "surface" that feature.


>Yes. I'm not even European, and I'm perfectly fine with this.

>Ask me to track me. If I like you, your web site, or your content, then sure. I'll give you a little personal data.

This should be a setting you choose in your browser and the rest of us (> 99%) should be able to ignore.


Yeah, it should be a header sent with every request. If it's 0, then feel free to track me. If it's 1, then please don't track me.

We could even call it "DNT", for "Do Not Track".


I agree they need to ask to track us.

But the little personal data you mention is not only given to them but to 224 different ad networks. Most of them make it impossible or difficult to opt out.


>Ask me to track me. If I like you, your web site, or your content, then sure. I'll give you a little personal data.

You are asking them for the website. They are asking for your data in return which your browser provides because that's how it is configured. Your browser could simply refuse at any point.




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: